Humoral Immunity of Parasitized, Malnourished Children

David T. PurtiloDepartment of Pathology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Pathology, University of Washington Medical School, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605

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Randall S. RiggsDepartment of Pathology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Pathology, University of Washington Medical School, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605

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Richard EvansDepartment of Pathology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Pathology, University of Washington Medical School, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605

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Ronald C. NeafieDepartment of Pathology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Pathology, University of Washington Medical School, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605

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The nutrition, intensity of parasitism, complete blood count, and the serum immunoglobulin concentration of 63 children were studied. Hyperimmunoglobulinemia was present in the vast majority of subjects regardless of their nutritional status. The IgA and IgM concentrations were moderately increased, the IgG was increased threefold, and the IgE was markedly increased in concentration. The concentrations of the immunoglobulins were related significantly to the intensity of parasitism.

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