Toxoplasmosis in Man and Animals in South Kalimantan (Borneo), Indonesia

Philip T. DurfeeMedical Ecology Department, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 2, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, National Institute of Health Research and Development, Ministry of Health, Health Service, Kabupaten Hulu Sungei Selatan, Taipei, Taiwan

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John H. CrossMedical Ecology Department, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 2, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, National Institute of Health Research and Development, Ministry of Health, Health Service, Kabupaten Hulu Sungei Selatan, Taipei, Taiwan

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RustamMedical Ecology Department, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 2, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, National Institute of Health Research and Development, Ministry of Health, Health Service, Kabupaten Hulu Sungei Selatan, Taipei, Taiwan

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SusantoMedical Ecology Department, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 2, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, National Institute of Health Research and Development, Ministry of Health, Health Service, Kabupaten Hulu Sungei Selatan, Taipei, Taiwan

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Sera from 1,050 persons, 69 cats, 18 goats, 23 bovines, 2 monkeys, and 1 dog from 7 villages in South Kalimantan were tested for indirect hemagglutination Toxoplasma gondii antibodies. A seroepidemiologic study with the methylene blue dye test was conducted 1 year later at one village among 25 families and their cats. Toxoplasma antibody prevalence in man in different villages varied from 9.7% to 51.0%. Forty-one percent of the cats and 61% of the goats also had positive titers. None of the bovines was positive. The epidemiologic study indicated that, in spite of the presence of many infected cats in the village, goat meat was a significant source of Toxoplasma infection for man in this population.

Author Notes

Present address: Bureau of Epidemiology, Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia 30333.

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