Toxoplasmosis and Cats in New Guinea

Gordon D. WallacePacific Research Section, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Public Health, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Honolulu, Hawaii

Search for other papers by Gordon D. Wallace in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Vincent ZigasPacific Research Section, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Public Health, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Honolulu, Hawaii

Search for other papers by Vincent Zigas in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
D. Carleton GajdusekPacific Research Section, Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Public Health, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Honolulu, Hawaii

Search for other papers by D. Carleton Gajdusek in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Toxoplasma antibody was not detected in, or was found in less than 2% of, primitive New Guineans inhabiting areas where either felids had never been present or where domestic cats had been recently introduced but were still limited in number and distribution. However, Toxoplasma antibody was detected in 14% to 34% of New Guineans living in areas where cats were more numerous and had been present longer. In comparison, Toxoplasma antibody was detected in 50% of Nonama Indians, a primitive people living in the Pacific jungles of Colombia, who also had no domestic cats but who hunt and eat neotropical Felidae.

Save