Comparison of the Indirect-Fluorescent Antibody and Indirect-Hemagglutination Tests for Malarial Antibody

Marianna WilsonParasitology Section, National Communicable Disease Center, Health Services and Mental Health Administration, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Atlanta, Georgia 30333

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A. J. SulzerParasitology Section, National Communicable Disease Center, Health Services and Mental Health Administration, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Atlanta, Georgia 30333

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W. A. Rogers Jr.Parasitology Section, National Communicable Disease Center, Health Services and Mental Health Administration, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Atlanta, Georgia 30333

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J. A. FriedParasitology Section, National Communicable Disease Center, Health Services and Mental Health Administration, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Atlanta, Georgia 30333

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H. M. MathewsParasitology Section, National Communicable Disease Center, Health Services and Mental Health Administration, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Atlanta, Georgia 30333

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Titers of 226 serum specimens tested by indirect-fluorescent antibody (IFA) and indirect-hemagglutination (IHA) tests for malaria were compared. Sixty-eight U. S. Army veterans who experimenced clinical attacks of Plasmodium vivax malaria at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, were promptly given radical curative treatment. Serum specimens were drawn from these men on four occasions: at diagnosis and onset of treatment, and at 3 weeks, 7 months, and 12 months after the onset of symptoms. For the first two time categories, the IFA and IHA titers were similar for 79.3% and 92.1% of the sera, respectively. In the 7-month and 12-month categories, however, the IHA titers were higher and present for longer periods than the IFA titers. IHA titers from men who had experienced previous attacks of malaria were significantly higher than those from men who had had no previous attacks. The IFA-test titers did not show this difference.

Author Notes

Parasitology Section, National Communicable Disease Center, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30333.

Department of Pathology and Oncology, College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Medical Alumni Building, Burlington, Vermont 05401.

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