Further Studies of the Xavante Indians

VIII. Some Observations on Blood, Urine, and Stool Specimens

James V. NeelUniversity of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

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William M. MikkelsenUniversity of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

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Donald L. RucknagelUniversity of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

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E. David WeinsteinUniversity of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

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Robert A. GoyerUniversity of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

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S. H. AbadieUniversity of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

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Summary

The Xavante Indians of the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso as a group were found to have 1) high mean plasma uric-acid levels, 2) low mean plasma cholesterol values, 3) high total plasma proteins, due to elevated γ-globulin fractions, 4) plasma-protein-bound iodines and iron values within the accepted norms, 5) a high frequency of persons with positive tests for the “rheumatoid factor,” 6) marked eosinophilia, and 7) a high frequency of stools positive for the ova of Ascaris, larvae of Strongyloides, and cysts of Entamoeba histolytica. Three of 53 “casual” urine specimens subjected to chromatography were characterized by elevations in specific amino acids, possibly indicative of a genetic carrier status.

Author Notes

Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Supported in part by U.S.P.H.S. grant GM-09252 and U.S.A.E.C. grant AT(11-1)-1552.

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Supported in part by U.S.P.H.S. grant AM-04677.

Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Supported in part by U.S.P.H.S. grant GM-00685.

Department of Tropical Medicine and Medical Parasitology, School of Medicine, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana.

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