Isolation of Machupo Virus from Wild Rodent Calomys callosus

K. M. Johnson U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Middle America Research Unit, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone

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M. L. Kuns U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Middle America Research Unit, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone

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R. B. Mackenzie U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Middle America Research Unit, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone

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P. A. Webb U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Middle America Research Unit, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone

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C. E. Yunker U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Middle America Research Unit, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone

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Summary

Nine virus strains were recovered from a small group of tissues from the wild rodent Calomys callosus captured in the area of San Joaquín, Bolivia, in 1963. Each virus was successfully reisolated and shown to be serologically related to Machupo virus, the etiologic agent of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever. Virus was not isolated from 33 specimens obtained from rodents of the genera Proechimys and Oryzomys. These data provide the first evidence for existence of a potential non-human reservoir of Machupo virus infection.

Author Notes

Present address: Yale Arbovirus Research Unit, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Rocky Mountain Laboratory, Hamilton, Montana (NIAID).

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