Medical Mycology

by Chester W. Emmons, Ph.D., Chief, Medical Mycology Section, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Bethesda, Maryland; Chapman H. Binford, A.B., M.D., Research Pathologist, Leonard Wood Memorial Foundation; Medical Director (Ret.), U.S. Public Health Service; Chief, Geographic Pathology Division and Chief, Leprosy Branch; Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.; and John P. Utz, M.D., Chief, Infectious Disease Service, Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Bethesda, Maryland. 380 pages, illustrated. Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia. 1963. $14

Marion HoodDepartment of Pathology Charity Hospital, New Orleans, Louisiana

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Medical Mycology provides a meeting ground for the various disciplines whose interests include Mycology.

An introductory chapter briefly reviews the role of fungi in industry and medicine. Chapter 2, Characterization of the Fungi, presents the salient features of the different types of fungi. The terms “saprophytic form” and “parasitic form” are suggested as substitutes for “mycelial phase” and “yeast phase” as presently applied to the diphasic fungi. A timely plea is made for rational, uniform pronunciation of specific names of the fungi. Basic rules are given with illustrative applications.

A chapter entitled Medical Mycology presents a discussion of the various methods of grouping the mycoses as geographic, topographic, epidemiologic in a manner to increase understanding of the problem.

The necessity of mustering all available evidence for diagnosis of fungus diseases is presented under Histopathologic Identification of Fungi.

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