Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): A Study of 951 Puerto Rican and 315 non-Puerto Rican Children in New York City

Harry Most Department of Preventive Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, and the New York City Health Department (Tropical Disease Clinic, Lower East Side Health Center), New York

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Gerald A. Gellin Department of Preventive Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, and the New York City Health Department (Tropical Disease Clinic, Lower East Side Health Center), New York

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Robert Yager Department of Preventive Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, and the New York City Health Department (Tropical Disease Clinic, Lower East Side Health Center), New York

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Bernard Aron Department of Preventive Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, and the New York City Health Department (Tropical Disease Clinic, Lower East Side Health Center), New York

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Milton Friedlander Department of Preventive Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, and the New York City Health Department (Tropical Disease Clinic, Lower East Side Health Center), New York

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Steven Quarfordt Department of Preventive Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, and the New York City Health Department (Tropical Disease Clinic, Lower East Side Health Center), New York

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Summary

One thousand one hundred and eighty-five children and 81 adolescents and young adults were examined for Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm). The cellulose adhesive (Scotch) tape method was employed. All were examined once except for 69 negative on the initial swab who were studied from 2 to 5 times. Eight more positive among them were then found.

The incidence among 951 Puerto Rican patients was 9.8%; that of 249 non-Puerto Rican white patients was 23.3%. This is statistically significant. There was no statistical difference in incidence between Puerto Ricans born in New York City (11.3%) and those born in Puerto Rico (9.3%).

A token survey of 66 Negro children yielded a low incidence in this group. Only 6.1% (4 cases) were infected.

There was no difference in infection rate with regard to sex. The peak age of infection was the 5- to 9-year-old group.

Author Notes

550 First Avenue, New York 16, New York.

Medical Student Fellow of the National Foundation (formerly the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis).

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