African Green Monkeys Maintain Zika Virus Neutralizing Antibodies for at Least 1,427 Days Postinfection

Andrew D. Haddow Virology Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland;
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia

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Stephanie V. Trefry Virology Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland;

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Farooq Nasar Virology Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland;

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Joshua D. Shamblin Virology Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland;

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M. Louise M. Pitt Virology Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland;

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ABSTRACT.

We report strong Zika virus (ZIKV) neutralizing antibody responses in African green monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus) up to 1,427 days after ZIKV exposure via the subcutaneous, intravaginal, or intrarectal routes. Our results suggest that immunocompetent African green monkeys previously infected with ZIKV are likely protected from reinfection for years, possibly life, and would not contribute to virus amplification during ZIKV epizootics.

Author Notes

Financial support: This study was supported by a grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Disclosure: The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy of the U.S. Department of Defense or the U.S. Army.

Authors’ addresses: Andrew D. Haddow, Virology Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD, and Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA, E-mail: ahaddow@kennesaw.edu. Stephanie V. Trefry, Farooq Nasar, Joshua D. Shamblin, and M. Louise M. Pitt, Virology Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD, E-mails: svaldez1@alumni.jh.edu, fanasar@utmb.edu, joshua.d.shamblin1.civ@health.mil, and margaret.l.pitt.civ@health.mil.

Address correspondence to Andrew D. Haddow, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Kennesaw State University, 370 Paulding Ave, Kennesaw, GA 30144. E-mail: ahaddow@kennesaw.edu
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