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Bacteriological Studies of Venomous Snakebite Wounds in Hangzhou, Southeast China

Sipin HuDepartment of Vascular Surgery, Tongde Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China;

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Zhengqing LouDepartment of Clinical Laboratory, Hangzhou TCM Hospital Affiliated to Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China;

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Yuchen ShenDepartment of Dermatology, Hangzhou TCM Hospital Affiliated to Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China

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Mengyun TuDepartment of Clinical Laboratory, Hangzhou TCM Hospital Affiliated to Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China;

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ABSTRACT.

Snakebite is a common occurrence in Hangzhou, and identifying bacteria in wounds is very important for snakebite treatment. To define the pattern of wound bacterial flora of venomous snakebites and their susceptibility to common antibiotics, we reviewed the medical charts of patients admitted with snakebite at Hangzhou TCM Hospital from January 2019 to December 2020. A total of 311 patients were enrolled in this study. Among them, bacteria culture was positive in 40 patients, and 80 organisms were isolated. The most frequent pathogens were Morganella morganii and Staphylococcus aureus. According to the results of susceptibility testing, a majority of the isolates were resistant to some common first-line antibiotics, such as ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, and cephazolin. Quinolones, however, have shown a better antibacterial effect. In conclusion, snakebite wounds involve a wide range of bacteria. Fluoroquinolones, such as levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, could be an alternative for empirical treatment in patients with snakebite when the effect of other antibiotics is poor.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Mengyun Tu, Department of Clinical Laboratory, Hangzhou TCM Hospital Affiliated to Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, No. 453 Tiyuchang Rd., Xihu District, 310007, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China. E-mail: appletumengyun@sina.cn

Disclaimer: The study project was allowed by The Institutional Ethics Committee, Hangzhou TCM Hospital, affiliated with the Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, and all research work complied with the Helsinki Declaration.

Authors’ addresses: Sipin Hu, Department of Vascular Surgery, Tongde Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: huuusp@outlook.com. Zhengqing Lou and Mengyun Tu, Department of Clinical Laboratory, Hangzhou TCM Hospital Affiliated to Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China, E-mails: hztcmlzq@163.com and appletumengyun@sina.cn. Yuchen Shen, Department of Dermatology, Hangzhou TCM Hospital Affiliated to Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China, E-mail: von979@hotmail.com.

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