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Developing Molecular Surveillance Capacity for Asymptomatic and Drug-Resistant Malaria in a Resource-Limited Setting—Experiences and Lessons Learned

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  • 1 Department of Medical Research, Ministry of Health and Sports, Yangon, Myanmar;
  • | 2 Center for Global Health, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York
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ABSTRACT.

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the important role molecular surveillance plays in public health. Such capacity however is either weak or nonexistent in many low-income countries. This article outlines a 2-year effort to establish two high-throughput molecular surveillance laboratories in Myanmar for tracking asymptomatic and drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The lessons learned from this endeavor may prove useful for others seeking to establish similar molecular surveillance capacity in other resource-limited settings.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Kayvan Zainabadi, Weill Cornell Medicine, Center for Global Health, 402 East 67th St., 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10021. kayvan@alum.mit.edu

Authors’ addresses: Kay Thwe Han and Zay Yar Han, Department of Medical Research, Ministry of Health and Sports, Yangon, Myanmar, E-mails: drkaythwehan@yahoo.com and drzayarhan@gmail.com. Kayvan Zainabadi, Center for Global Health, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, E-mail: kayvan@alum.mit.edu.

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