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Molecular Evaluation of Human Parvovirus B19 Infection and Associated Risk Factors among Pregnant Women in Bushehr Province, Southern Iran

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  • 1 Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran
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ABSTRACT.

Given the importance of human parvovirus B19 infection during pregnancy and the potential risks to the fetus, this study was designed to determine the prevalence, genotypic pattern, and risk factors of parvovirus B19 infection among a population-based sample of pregnant women in Bushehr Province, southern Iran. A total of 824 pregnant women were enrolled in this study. Serum samples were screened for the detection of anti-parvovirus B19 IgM and IgG by ELISA. The molecular evaluation was performed by nested polymerase chain reaction, targeting the non-structural protein 1–viral protein 1 unique region of the genome, and sequencing. Of 824 pregnant women, 330 (40.1%) were positive for anti-parvovirus B19 IgG and 50 women (6.1%) had anti-parvovirus B19 IgM. A greater rate of anti-parvovirus B19 IgG seroprevalence was observed in women older than 39 years, in Afghan immigrants, and in those women with more parities. Anti-parvovirus B19 IgM seroprevalence decreased with increasing gestational age and was significantly greater among women in the first trimester of pregnancy and among residents of the city of Borazjan. Moreover, 0.73% of the pregnant women had parvovirus B19 viremia with genotype 1 and subtype 1a. Parvovirus B19 DNA was detected in the samples collected in late autumn and winter, which is a rainy season associated with temperate climes in southern Iran. According to the results of this study, approximately 60% of pregnant women in this region are serologically negative and susceptible to parvovirus B19 infection. Therefore, assessment for maternal parvovirus B19 infection is important and should be considered as part of the fetal–maternal health policy in Iran.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Fatemeh Farshadpour, Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences 751463334, Moallem St., Bushehr, Iran. E-mail: f.farshadpour@bpums.ac.ir

Financial support: This study was funded by the Deputy of Research and Affairs, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran (grant no. 358).

Authors’ addresses: Reza Taherkhani, Fatemeh Farshadpour, and Masomeh Norozi, Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran, E-mails: r.taherkhani@bpums.ac.ir, f.farshadpour@bpums.ac.ir, and mn91123@gmail.com.

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