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The Immigrant Partnership and Advocacy Curricular Kit: A Comprehensive Train-the-Trainer Curriculum in Immigrant and Refugee Health

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  • 1 Adolescent Medicine and Gender Health, Children’s Hospitals, Minneapolis, Minnesota;
  • | 2 Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine/Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio;
  • | 3 School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin;
  • | 4 Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin;
  • | 5 The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio;
  • | 6 University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota;
  • | 7 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois;
  • | 8 University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
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ABSTRACT.

The number of immigrants and refugees in the United States is growing, yet many trainees and clinicians feel unprepared to manage the diverse needs of this population. This perspective piece describes the development of the Immigrant Partnership and Advocacy Curricular Kit (I-PACK) by the Midwest Consortium of Global Child Health Educators. I-PACK is an adjunct to the Consortium’s sugarprep.org global health curricular materials. Using Kern’s six-step approach to curriculum development, they developed eight modules in immigrant and refugee health that incorporate interactive learning activities. The I-PACK was launched as an open-access resource in September 2020. As of September 2021, the curriculum has been freely available at sugarprep.org/i-pack and downloaded from educators in 15 countries. The I-PACK curriculum can address a growing need in medical education to empower learners and clinicians to provide competent and compassionate care for immigrants and refugees.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Carmen Cobb, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. E-mail: carmen.cobb@ucsf.edu

Authors’ addresses: Kathleen K. Miller, Adolescent Medicine and Gender Health, Children’s Hospitals of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, E-mail: miller.katykennedy@gmail.com. Amy R. L. Rule and Rachel Bensman, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine/Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, E-mails: amy.rule@cchmc.org and rachel.bensman@cchmc.org. Sabrina Butteris, Laura Houser, and Nicole E. St Clair, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, E-mails: sbutteris@pediatrics.wisc.edu, lhouser@pediatrics.wisc.edu, and nstclair@wisc.edu. Caitlin Kaeppler, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, E-mail: ckaeppler@mcw.edu. Stephanie M. Lauden, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, E-mail: stephanie.lauden@nationwidechildrens.org. Michael B. Pitt, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, E-mail: mbpitt@umn.edu. Kristin Van Ganderen, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, E-mail: kvangenderen@luriechildrens.org. Carmen Cobb, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, E-mail: carmen.cobb@ucsf.edu.

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