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Predictive Value of Glycemia and Free Fatty Acid Levels upon Admission of Children with Scorpionism in Egypt

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  • 1 Department of Pediatrics, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University, Qena, Egypt;
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Pathology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University, Egypt;
  • | 3 Department of Anaesthesia and ICU, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt;
  • | 4 Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt

ABSTRACT.

Scorpion envenomation is a life-threatening emergency and causes serious health problems in tropical and subtropical regions. The aim of this study was to correlate the serum levels of biochemical parameters at admission in children with scorpion envenomation with subsequent morbidity and mortality. It was a prospective, observational, and descriptive study conducted for scorpion-envenomed children who presented to emergency and intensive care units between April 2019 and September 2019. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings of patients were recorded and tabulated. Routine investigations were done for all patients in addition to blood levels of lactate, free fatty acids (FFA), and insulin. All patients were compared according to outcome as survivors and nonsurvivors and according to glucose level as normoglycemic and hyperglycemic groups. There were 62 scorpion sting cases; their mean age was 8.6 ± 3.2 years. Patients aged more than 6 years (74.2%), and males (66.1%) were more affected than others. As regards severity, 25.8% were suffering organ dysfunction, 40.3% suffered systemic manifestations without organ dysfunction, and (33.9%) with only local manifestations. Serum glucose and FFA were significantly higher in nonsurvivors compared with survivors. Shock, convulsion, coma, heart failure, and pulmonary edema were significantly more common in hyperglycemic than normoglycemic group. Hyperglycemia, and raised FFA were associated with severe scorpion envenomation. Raised FFA was well correlated with presence of heart failure, leucocytosis, and hyperglycemia. Adding serum glucose and FFA to monitoring parameters of scorpionism severity can help the prediction of high-risk patients.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Khaled Abdalla Abd-Elbaseer, Department of Pediatrics, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University, Qena 83523, Egypt. E-mail: khaledabdalla20@yahoo.com

Authors’ addresses: Khaled Abdalla Abd-Elbaseer, Eman Ahmed Abd-Elmawgood, and H. M. Qubaisy, Department of Pediatrics, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University, Qena, Egypt, E-mails: khaledabdalla20@yahoo.com, emanpediatrics@yahoo.com, and hebaqubasy@gmail.com. Abdel-Rahman Abdel-Hamed El-Saied, Department of Clinical Pathology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University, Egypt, E-mail: aelsaied@hotmail.com. Mohamed A. A. Abdel Naser, Department of Anaesthesia and ICU, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt, E-mail: monbasser@yahoo.com. Yaser F. Abd-Elraheem, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt, E-mail: yaser.rezk@med.aun.edu.eg.

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