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Comparison of Different Mosquito Traps for Zoonotic Arbovirus Vectors in Papua New Guinea

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  • 1 Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Papua New Guinea;
  • | 2 Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Smithfield, Australia;
  • | 3 CSIRO, Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness, Geelong, Australia
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ABSTRACT.

Vector surveillance is important to control mosquito-borne diseases. We compared the efficacies of three mosquito-trapping devices: the CDC light trap with incandescent light (CDC_I), the CDC light trap with ultraviolet light (CDC_UV), and the Biogents-sentinel (BG) trap, to identify a suitable and cost-effective surveillance tool for key vectors of neglected zoonotic arboviral diseases in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Of 13,788 female mosquitoes, CDC_I caught 7.9%, BG caught 14.5%, and CDC_UV caught 77.6%. Culex was the most predominant genus caught in all the traps. Centers for Disease Control light trap with ultraviolet light trap captured the highest abundance, highest species richness of mosquitoes and exhibited the highest overall Culex mosquito capture rates compared with BG and CDC_l. This study represents the first assessment of trapping devices for zoonotic arbovirus vectors in PNG. We recommend the CDC _UV trap for future monitoring and surveillance of infectious arboviral vector programs in PNG.

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Author Notes

Address correspondence to Melanie Koinari, Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, 1/14-88 McGregor Rd., Smithfield, Queensland, Australia. E-mail: melanie.koinari@jcu.edu.au

These authors contributed equally to this work.

Financial support: This work was supported by funding from the Research for One Health Systems Strengthening program delivered through the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (project no. LS/2018/213) in partnership with the Indo-Pacific Centre for Health Security within the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Authors’ addresses: Joelyn Goi, Sakur Muker, Rebecca Vinit, and William Pomat, Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Papua New Guinea, E-mails: joelyngoi@gmail.com, sakurmuker@gmail.com, rebeccavinit31@gmail.com, and william.pomat@pngimr.org.pg. Melanie Koinari, Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Smithfield, Australia, E-mail: melanie.koinari@jcu.edu.au. David Williams, CSIRO, Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness, Geelong, Australia, E-mail: d.williams@csiro.au. Stephan Karl, Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Papua New Guinea, and Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Smithfield, Australia, E-mail: stephanunkarl@googlemail.com.

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