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Case Report: Cerebral Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Chaetomium strumarium in a Child with Visceral Heterotaxy Syndrome

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  • 1 Department of Pediatrics/Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico;
  • | 2 Department of Pediatrics/Infectious Diseases Service, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico;
  • | 3 Department of Neurology, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico;
  • | 4 Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico;
  • | 5 Department of Microbiology, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico;
  • | 6 Department of Microbiology; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico;
  • | 7 Department of Microbiology; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico;
  • | 8 Hospital Epidemiology Surveillance Unit, Christus Muguerza Hospital Alta Especialidad, Obispado, Universidad de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico
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ABSTRACT.

Chaetomium sp. is a mold, member of the phylum Ascomycota. Clinical disease in humans is rare, particularly in children, for which only five cases have been reported. We report a 7-months-old female patient with a diagnosis of visceral heterotaxy syndrome who was admitted to a private center in Mexico. After two episodes of focal myoclonic seizure, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a right porencephalic cyst and a right frontal abscess with ventriculitis. Seventy-two hours after temporal abscesses drainage procedure, the culture showed a rapidly growing pale white fungal colony. Sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and D1/D2 led to the identification of Chaetomium strumarium. Although Chaetomium sp. is a rare fungal infection in humans, clinicians should consider it as a plausible etiologic agent that can form brain abscess.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to José Iván Castillo Bejarano, Department of Pediatrics/Infectious Diseases Service; Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, ZC 64460 Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico. E-mail: jose.castillobj@uanl.edu.mx

Disclosure: Written informed consent was obtained from the patient’s parents for publication of the case details and accompanying images.

Authors’ addresses: Bárbara Cárdenas Del Castillo, Department of Pediatrics/Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mail: bgcardenas8@gmail.com. José Iván Castillo Bejarano, Department of Pediatrics/Infectious Diseases Service, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mail: jicastillobejarano@gmail.com. Oscar DeLaGarza-Pineda, Department of Neurology, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mail: odelagarza@neuropediatria.mx. José Ascención Arenas Ruiz, Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mail: joasarenas@gmail.com. Hiram Villanueva Lozano, Department of Microbiology, Facultad de Medicina, Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mail: dr.villanueval@hotmail.com. Rogelio de J. Treviño-Rangel, Department of Microbiology; Facultad de Medicina, Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mail: roghe24@gmail.com. Gloria González M., Department of Microbiology; Facultad de Medicina, Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mail: gmglez@yahoo.com.mx. Joyce Marie García Martínez, Hospital Epidemiology Surveillance Unit; Christus Muguerza Hospital Alta Especialidad, Hidalgo Avenue, Obispado, Universidad de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mail: joyce.garcia@udem.edu.

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