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Detection of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Rotavirus-Infected Ghanaian Children Diagnosed with Acute Gastroenteritis

Bartholomew DzudzorDepartment of Medical Biochemistry, University of Ghana Medical School, Korle-Bu, Ghana;

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Albert AmenyedorDepartment of Medical Biochemistry, University of Ghana Medical School, Korle-Bu, Ghana;

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Vincent AmarhDepartment of Medical Biochemistry, University of Ghana Medical School, Korle-Bu, Ghana;

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George E. ArmahNoguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana

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ABSTRACT.

Diarrhea is a notable global health problem in several developing countries, especially in children. Prior to the introduction of the rotavirus vaccination program in Ghana, a surveillance study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of the disease caused by rotavirus in children. In this report, we re-used archival stool samples from the pre-vaccine surveillance study to provide information on prevalence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Ghanaian children. Re-analysis of the stool samples revealed co-infection of enterotoxigenic E. coli and rotavirus in 2% of the children whose samples were selected for this study. As Ghana is approaching 10 years post-implementation of the rotavirus vaccination program, the preliminary data presented in this report are a vital reference for subsequent studies aimed at ascertaining the effect of the vaccine on both rotavirus and enterotoxigenic E. coli.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Bartholomew Dzudzor, Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Ghana Medical School, P.O. Box KB 4236, Korle-Bu, Accra, Ghana. E-mail: bdzudzor@ug.edu.gh

Authors’ addresses: Bartholomew Dzudzor, Albert Amenyedor, and Vincent Amarh, Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Ghana Medical School, Korle-Bu, Ghana, E-mails: bdzudzor@ug.edu.gh, albertamenyedor@yahoo.com, and vamarh@ug.edu.gh. George E. Armah, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana, E-mail: garmah@noguchi.ug.edu.gh.

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