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Snakebite Management and One Health in Asia Using an Integrated Historical, Social, And Ecological Framework

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  • 1 School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China;
  • | 2 Department of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon
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ABSTRACT.

Snakebite envenomation continues to contribute to high fatality and morbidity rates across Asia. Yet snake bite is one of many outcomes due to human-snake conflicts, which themselves are only one type of human-snake relationship among the diversity of such interactions. We propose that human-snake relationships need to be explored from a perspective integrative of history, ecology, and culture in order to adequately and holistically address snake bite. In order to contextualize this concept within a language already understood in conservation research, we characterize and develop four interconnected themes defining human-snake relationships as a social ecological system. By breaking down the multifaceted nature of human-snake relationships under a social ecological systems framework, we explore its applicability in contributing to a unified strategy, drawing from both social and natural sciences for ending the snakebite crisis.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Félix Landry Yuan, School of Biological Sciences, Kadoorie Biological Sciences Building, The University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road, Hong Kong SAR, China. E-mail: flyuan@connect.hku.hk

Authors’ addresses: Félix Landry Yuan, Sam Yue, and Timothy C. Bonebrake, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China, E-mails: flyuan@connect.hku.hk, yue.cy.sam@gmail.com, and tbone@hku.hk. Anne Devan-Song, Department of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, E-mail: anne.devansong@oregonstate.edu.

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