• 1.

    Lowe S, Browne M, Boudjelas S, De Poorter M, 2000. 100 of the World’s Worst Invasive Alien Species: A Selection from the Global Invasive Species Database. Auckland, New Zealand: Invasive Species Specialist Group Auckland.

  • 2.

    Lwande OW et al., 2020. Globe-trotting Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus: risk factors for arbovirus pandemics. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 20: 7181.

  • 3.

    Wilder-Smith A, Gubler DJ, Weaver SC, Monath TP, Heymann DL, Scott TW, 2017. Epidemic arboviral diseases: priorities for research and public health. Lancet Infect Dis 17: e101e106.

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    LaBeaud A, Bashir F, King CH, 2011. Measuring the burden of arboviral diseases: the spectrum of morbidity and mortality from four prevalent infections. Popul Health Metr 9: 1.

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Kabir I, Dhimal M, Muller R, Banik S, Haque U, 2017. The 2017 Dhaka chikungunya outbreak. Lancet Infect Dis 17: 1118.

  • 6.

    Mamun MA, Misti JM, Griffiths MD, Gozal D, 2019. The dengue epidemic in Bangladesh: risk factors and actionable items. Lancet 394: 21492150.

  • 7.

    Paul KK et al., 2018. Risk factors for the presence of dengue vector mosquitoes, and determinants of their prevalence and larval site selection in Dhaka, Bangladesh. PLoS One 13: e0199457.

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Salje H et al., 2019. Nationally-representative serostudy of dengue in Bangladesh allows generalizable disease burden estimates. eLife 8: e42869.

  • 9.

    Matsuo N, 2019. Discovery and development of pyrethroid insecticides. Proc Jpn Acad, Ser B, Phys Biol Sci 95: 378400.

  • 10.

    Al-Amin HM et al., 2020. Insecticide resistance status of Aedes aegypti in Bangladesh. Parasit Vectors 13: 622.

  • 11.

    Alam MS, Al-Amin HM, Khan WA, Haque R, Nahlen BL, Lobo NF, 2020. Preliminary report of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles vagus, an important malaria vector in Bangladesh. Am J Trop Med Hyg 103: 810811.

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Bharati M, Rai P, Saha D, 2019. Insecticide resistance in Aedes albopictus Skuse from sub-Himalayan districts of West Bengal, India. Acta Trop 192: 104111.

  • 13.

    Chatterjee M, Ballav S, Maji AK, Basu N, Sarkar BC, Saha P, 2018. Polymorphisms in voltage-gated sodium channel gene and susceptibility of Aedes albopictus to insecticides in three districts of northern West Bengal, India. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 12: e0006192.

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Brogdon W, Chan A, 2010. Guidelines for Evaluating Insecticide Resistance in Vectors Using the CDC Bottle Bioassay/Methods in Anopheles Research. Atlanta, GA: CDC. CDC Technical Report: 28.

Past two years Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 441 441 39
Full Text Views 43 43 8
PDF Downloads 54 54 10
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

Preliminary Report of the Insecticide Susceptibility Status of Aedes albopictus in Bangladesh

Hasan Mohammad Al-AminInternational Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh;
QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR Berghofer), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia;

Search for other papers by Hasan Mohammad Al-Amin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Seth IrishDivision of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia;
President’s Malaria Initiative, Bureau for Global Health, Office of Infectious Disease, United Agency for International Development, Washington, District of Columbia

Search for other papers by Seth Irish in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Audrey LenhartDivision of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia;

Search for other papers by Audrey Lenhart in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Mohammad Shafiul AlamInternational Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh;

Search for other papers by Mohammad Shafiul Alam in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

ABSTRACT.

Aedes albopictus is a highly invasive mosquito species and a vector of human arboviral diseases including dengue, chikungunya, and Zika. There are no effective drugs or vaccines for the treatment or prevention of most of these diseases, so the primary option for disease prevention and control is to target mosquitoes, often using insecticides. Despite vector control efforts, cases of arboviral diseases are increasing in Bangladesh and it is important to understand if this escalation is associated with the presence of insecticide resistance in Aedes populations, including Ae. albopictus. The CDC bottle bioassays performed on Ae. albopictus from two districts in Bangladesh detected resistance to permethrin but susceptibility to deltamethrin, malathion, and bendiocarb. The detection of permethrin resistance is worrisome, since arbovirus vector control strategies in Bangladesh currently include the use of permethrin. Routine monitoring of the susceptibility status of key vector populations in Bangladesh will allow a better understanding of resistance trends, enabling the strengthening of control strategies.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Mohammad Shafiul Alam, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sarani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh. E-mail: shafiul@icddrb.org

Funding support: This study was funded by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Atlanta, GA), grant number 3U01GH001207-03S1. S. I. was funded by President’s Malaria Initiative.

Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Disclosure: This study was approved by the Research Review Committee and Ethical Review Committee of icddr,b, protocol number PR 17050. The purpose and objectives of the study were fully explained to the head of each household and after obtaining verbal consent, ovitraps were installed for mosquito egg collection.

Authors’ addresses: Hasan Mohammad Al-Amin, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh, and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR Berghofer), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, E-mail: hasan.al-amin@qimrberghofer.edu.au. Seth Irish, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, and President’s Malaria Initiative, Bureau for Global Health, Office of Infectious Disease, United Agency for International Development, Washington, DC, E-mail: xjs7@cdc.gov. Audrey Lenhart, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: ajl8@cdc.gov. Mohammad Shafiul Alam, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh, E-mail: shafiul@icddrb.org.

Save