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Prevalence and Factors Associated with Maternal Group B Streptococcus Colonization in Madagascar and Senegal

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  • 1 Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Senegal;
  • | 2 Pharmacoepidemiology and Infectious Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France;
  • | 3 Experimental Bacteriology Unit, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Senegal;
  • | 4 Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal;
  • | 5 Medical Biology Laboratory, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Senegal;
  • | 6 Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, Antananarivo, Madagascar;
  • | 7 Infectious Disease Detection and Surveillance, ICF International, Antananarivo, Madagascar;
  • | 8 Pediatrics Unit, Roi Baudoin Hospital, Guédiawaye, Senegal;
  • | 9 Pediatrics and Neonatology Unit, Soavinandriana Hospital, Antananarivo, Madagascar;
  • | 10 Biology of Gram-Positive Pathogens Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France;
  • | 11 Unité Mixte de Recherche 2001, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France;
  • | 12 Epidemiology and Public Health Unit, Institut Pasteur du Cambodge, Phnom Penh, Cambodia;
  • | 13 Experimental Bacteriology Unit, Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, Antananarivo, Madagascar;
  • | 14 Experimental Bacteriology Laboratory, Center for Microbes, Development and Health, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai/Chinese Academy of Sciences, People’s Republic of China;
  • | 15 Anti-infective Evasion and Pharmacoepidemiology Unit, Université Paris-Saclay, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Montigny-le-Bretonneux, France;
  • | 16 Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Paris, France;
  • | 17 Epidemiology of Emerging Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France

ABSTRACT.

Maternal group B Streptococcus (GBS) colonization is a major risk factor for neonatal GBS infection. However, data on GBS are scarce in low- and middle-income countries. Using sociodemographic data and vaginal swabs collected from an international cohort of mothers and newborns, this study aimed to estimate the prevalence of GBS colonization among pregnant women in Madagascar (n = 1,603) and Senegal (n = 616). The prevalence was 5.0% (95% CI, 3.9–6.1) and 16.1% (95% CI, 13.1–19.0) in Madagascar and Senegal, respectively. No factors among sociodemographic characteristics, living conditions, and obstetric history were found to be associated independently with GBS colonization in both countries. This community-based study provides one of the first estimates of maternal GBS colonization among pregnant women from Madagascar and Senegal.

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Author Notes

Address correspondence to Muriel Vray, Institut Pasteur Paris, 25-28 Rue du Dr Roux, 75015 Paris. E-mail: muriel.vray@pasteur.fr

These authors contributed equally to this work.

Additional members of the BIRDY study group are listed in “Acknowledgments” at the end of this article.

Financial support: This study was supported by the Total Foundation, the African Center for Maternal and Child Health (Centre d’Excellence Africain pour la Santé de la Mère et de l’Enfant), and by the Department of International Cooperation of the Principality of Monaco.

Authors’ addresses: Yu-Jin Jung and Fatoumata Diene Sarr, Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Senegal, E-mails: jung.yujin.lille@gmail.com and fatoumata.sarr@pasteur.sn. Bich-Tram Huynh, Pharmacoepidemiology and Infectious Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France, E-mail: bich-tram.huynh@pasteur.fr. Abdoulaye Seck, Experimental Bacteriology Unit, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Senegal, and Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Odontology, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal, E-mail: abdoulaye.seck@pasteur.sn. Raymond Bercion, Medical Biology Laboratory, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Senegal, E-mail: raymond.bercion@pasteur.sn. Perlinot Herindrainy, Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, Antananarivo, Madagascar, and Infectious Disease Detection and Surveillance, ICF International, Antananarivo, Madagascar, E-mail: perlinot.herindrainy@icf.com. Jean-Baptiste Diouf, Pediatrics Unit, Roi Baudoin Hospital, Guédiawaye, Senegal, E-mail: jeanniokhor@yahoo.fr. Zafitsara Zo Andrianirina, Pediatrics and Neonatology Unit, Soavinandriana Hospital, Antananarivo, Madagascar, E-mail: zozand03@yahoo.fr. Arnaud Firon and Patrick Trieu-Cuot, Biology of Gram-Positive Pathogens Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France, and 10ERL 2006, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Unité Mixte de Recherche 2001, Paris, France, E-mails: arnaud.firon@pasteur.fr and patrick.trieu-cuot@pasteur.fr. Sophie Goyet, Epidemiology and Public Health Unit, Institut Pasteur du Cambodge, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, E-mail: sophiegoyet@gmail.com. Jean-Marc Collard, Experimental Bacteriology Unit, Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, Antananarivo, Madagascar, and Experimental Bacteriology Laboratory, Center for Microbes, Development and Health, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai/Chinese Academy of Sciences, People's Republic of China, E-mail: jean-marc.collard@ips.ac.cn. Elisabeth Delarocque-Astagneau, Anti-infective Evasion and Pharmacoepidemiology Unit, Université Paris-Saclay, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Montigny-le-Bretonneux, France, and Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Paris, France, E-mail: elisabeth.delarocqueastagneau@aphp.fr. Didier Guillemot, Pharmacoepidemiology and Infectious Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France, and Anti-infective Evasion and Pharmacoepidemiology Unit, Université Paris-Saclay, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Montigny-le-Bretonneux, France, E-mail: didier.guillemot@pasteur.fr. Muriel Vray, Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, Senegal, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Paris, France, and Epidemiology of Emerging Diseases Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France, E-mail: muriel.vray@pasteur.fr.

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