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Epidemiology of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in Tuberculosis Suspects

Parasmal SureshCenter for Nanosciences and Molecular medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India;

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Anil KumarDepartment of Microbiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India;

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Raja BiswasCenter for Nanosciences and Molecular medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India;

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Divya VijayakumarDepartment of Microbiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India;

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Swathy ThulasidharanDepartment of Microbiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India;

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Gopikrishnan AnjaneyanDepartment of Dermatology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India;

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Akhilesh KunoorDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India

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Lalitha BiswasCenter for Nanosciences and Molecular medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India;

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ABSTRACT.

Nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that cause a wide range of illnesses. Here, the species distribution and prevalence of NTM infections in tuberculosis suspects was analyzed. A total of 7,073 specimens from pulmonary and extrapulmonary sites were analyzed, and 709 (10%) were found to be culture positive for mycobacteria. Of these, 85.2% were identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and 14.8% as NTM (65.7% rapid growers and 34.3% slow growers). Speciation of the NTM isolates (n = 69) identified 19 NTM species. M. abscessus (33.3%) and M. fortuitum (24.6%) were the most dominant NTM species isolated from the patients, followed by M. porcinum (5.8%) and M. parascrofulaceum (4.3%). We also report peritonitis caused by rapidly growing NTM among the patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and a case of M. senegalense peritonitis. A low prevalence but high species diversity of NTM was detected in our study. The high species diversity of NTM necessitates the need to unequivocally identify mycobacterial isolates for appropriate treatment.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Anil Kumar, Department of Microbiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi-682041, Kerala, India, E-mail: vanilkumar@aims.amrita.edu or Lalitha Biswas, Center for Nanosciences and Molecular medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara, Kochi-682041, Kerala, India, E-mail: lalithabiswas@aims.amrita.edu.

Authors’ addresses: Parasmal Suresh, Center for Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi, Kerala, India, E-mail: parassureshjn@gmail.com. Anil Kumar, Microbiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Ponekara, Kochi, Kerala, India, E-mail: vanilkumar@aims.amrita.edu. Raja Biswas and Lalitha Biswas, Center for Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi, Kerala, India, E-mails: rajabiswas@aims.amrita.edu and lalithabiswas@aims.amrita.edu. Gopikrishnan Anjaneyan, Department of Dermatology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Kochi, Kerala, India, E-mail: gopi19430@aims.amrita.edu. Divya Vijayakumar and Swathy Thulasidharan, Department of Microbiology, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Kochi, Kerala, India, E-mails: divarchives@gmail.com and swathy.thulasidharan@gmail.com. Akhilesh Kunoor, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Kochi, Kerala, India, E-mail: akhileshk@aims.amrita.edu.

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