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Multiplex Bead Assay for the Detection of Human IgG Antibody Responses to African Trypanosomes

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  • 1 Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia;
  • | 2 Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

ABSTRACT.

The recent introduction of large-scale, population-based serologic surveys in several nations where human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains endemic could provide an opportunity to better map the remaining disease foci and to identify asymptomatic, seropositive individuals who are infected with the more chronic form of the parasite, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (gHAT). We have incorporated a soluble form of variant surface glycoprotein 117 and a recombinant invariant surface glycoprotein 65.1 into a multiplex bead assay (MBA) method that is commonly used for the detection of IgG antibody responses to other neglected tropical diseases. A positive result was defined as reactivity to both antigens. MBA sensitivity and specificity for gHAT infection were 92% and 96%, respectively. Assay specificity for the acute form of disease caused by T.b. rhodesiense (rHAT) was 94%, but the sensitivity was only 63.6%. In the future, additional antigens could be incorporated into the multiplex assay to improve rHAT sensitivity.

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    • Supplemental Materials (PDF 48 KB)

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Jeffrey W. Priest, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, Mail Stop H23-9, Bldg. 23, Rm. 9-164, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd. NE, Atlanta, GA 30329. E-mail: jpriest@cdc.gov

Financial support: The Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria and the Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Disease at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided intramural support for this work.

Disclaimer: Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by the Public Health Service or by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or any other institution.

Authors’ addresses: Jeffrey W. Priest, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: jpriest@cdc.gov. Sukwan Handali, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: ahi0@cdc.gov.

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