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Pediatric Hospital Medicine and Global Health: A Fitting Niche for an Emerging Subspecialty

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  • 1 Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas;
  • | 2 Baylor College of Medicine International Pediatric AIDS Initiative (BIPAI) at Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, Texas;
  • | 3 Perinatal Institute and Division of Hospital Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center/University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio;
  • | 4 Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Maimonides Children’s Hospital at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York;
  • | 5 Baylor College of Medicine Children’s Foundation – Lesotho, Maseru, Lesotho;
  • | 6 Saint-Damien Pediatrics Hospital, Tabarre, Haiti;
  • | 7 Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
  • | 8 School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky;
  • | 9 Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia;
  • | 10 Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia;
  • | 11 Division of Medical Critical Care, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

ABSTRACT.

As North American hospitals serve increasingly diverse patient populations, including recent immigrants, refugees, and returned travelers, all pediatric hospitalists (PHs) require foundational competency in global health, and a subset of PHs are carving out niches focused in global health. Pediatric hospitalists are uniquely positioned to collaborate with low- and middle-income country clinicians and child health advocates to improve the health of hospitalized children worldwide. Using the 2018 WHO standards for improving the quality of care for children and adolescents worldwide, we describe how PHs’ skills align closely with what the WHO and others have identified as essential elements to bring high-quality, sustainable care to children in low- and middle-income countries. Furthermore, North American global health hospitalists bring home expertise that reciprocally benefits their home institutions.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Heather Haq, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Ave, Suite 630, Houston, TX 77030. E-mail: heather.haq@bcm.edu

Authors’ addreses: Heather Haq, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, and Baylor College of Medicine International Pediatric AIDS Initiative (BIPAI) at Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, E-mail: heather.haq@bcm.edu. Amy R. L. Rule, Perinatal Institute and Division of Hospital Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center/University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, E-mail: amy.long@cchmc.org. Alexandra Coria, Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Maimonides Children’s Hospital at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, E-mail: acoria@maimonidesmed.org. Lineo K. Thahane, Baylor College of Medicine Children’s Foundation – Lesotho, Maseru, Lesotho, E-mail: lthahane@baylorlesotho.org. Regina M. Duperval, Saint-Damien Pediatrics Hospital, Tabarre, Haiti, E-mail: reginaduperval@gmail.com. Adelaide Barnes, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, E-mail: barnesae@email.chop.edu. Tania Condurache, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, E-mail: tania.condurache@louisville.edu. Kathy Ferrer, Children's National Hospital, Washington, DC, E-mail: kferrer@childrensnational.org. Michelle J. Shenoy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, E-mail: michelle.javier@bcm.edu. Joanne Mendoza, Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, E-mail: jm7zg@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu. Christiana M. Russ, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, E-mail: christiana.russ@childrens.harvard.edu.

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