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A Passport for a New Era of Learning

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  • 1 Center for Global Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pediatrics, Aurora, Colorado;
  • | 2 University of Minnesota School of Medicine & Masonic Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Minneapolis, Minnesota;
  • | 3 University of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health, Department of Pediatrics, Madison, Wisconsin;
  • | 4 University of Louisville School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Louisville, Kentucky;
  • | 5 University of Minnesota School of Medicine & Masonic Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Minneapolis, Minnesota

ABSTRACT.

Over the last several years, there has been a surge of readily available curricular resources for global health (GH) educators that theoretically has enabled them to overcome the barrier of needing to create new content for their programs. Despite this increase in available resources, integrating GH education into the already busy schedule of residency is a common challenge to the growing number of GH track directors. In this perspectives piece, GH educators from multiple institutions will share a novel model for packaging, administering, and monitoring GH educational curricula. This model transposes traditional GH learning objectives into self-paced, longitudinal maps of opportunities suitable for the time-intensive demands of residency, with flexibility for individual learning preferences and built-in tracking mechanisms.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Risha L. Moskalewicz, 6th Floor East Building, M653, 2450 Riverside Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55454. E-mail: risha@umn.edu

Authors’ addresses: Jessica B. Landry, Center for Global Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pediatrics, Aurora, CO, E-mail: jessica.landry@ucdenver.edu. Michael B. Pitt, University of Minnesota School of Medicine & Masonic Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Minneapolis, MN, E-mail: mbpitt@umn.edu. Nicole E. St Clair, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health, Department of Pediatrics, Madison, WI, E-mail: nstclair@pediatrics.wisc.edu. Sheridan Langford, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Louisville, KY, E-mail: sheridan.langford@louisville.edu. Risha L. Moskalewicz, University of Minnesota School of Medicine & Masonic Children’s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Minneapolis, MN, E-mail: risha@umn.edu.

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