• 1.

    Belo VS et al., 2013. Factors associated with visceral leishmaniasis in the americas: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7: e2182.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Alvar J et al., 1994. Canine leishmaniasis: clinical, parasitological and entomological follow-up after chemotherapy. Ann Trop Med Parasitol 88: 371378.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Gomes YM, Paiva Cavalcanti M, Lira RA, Abath FG, Alves LC, 2008. Diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis: biotechnological advances. Vet J 175: 4552.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Travi BL, Cordeiro-da-Silva A, Dantas-Torres F, Miró G, 2018. Canine visceral leishmaniasis: diagnosis and management of the reservoir living among us. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 12: e0006082.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Peixoto HM, de Oliveira MR, Romero GA, 2015. Serological diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil: systematic review and meta-analysis. Trop Med Int Health 20: 334352.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Liu YP, Yao CY, 2015. Rapid and quantitative detection of hepatitis B virus. World J Gastroenterol 21: 1195411963.

  • 7.

    Cohen JF et al.2013. Rapid-antigen detection tests for group a streptococcal pharyngitis: revisiting false-positive results using polymerase chain reaction testing. J Pediatr 162: 12821284.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Mandell LA et al.2007. Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society consensus guidelines on the management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Clin Infect Dis 44 (Suppl 2 ):S27S72.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Dionne M, Hatchette T, Forward K, 2003. Clinical utility of a Legionella pneumophila urinary antigen test in a large university teaching hospital. Can J Infect Dis 14: 8588.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Pollock NR et al., 2013. Validation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1681 protein as a diagnostic marker of active pulmonary tuberculosis. J Clin Microbiol 51: 13671373.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Beadle C et al., 1994. Diagnosis of malaria by detection of Plasmodium falciparum HRP-2 antigen with a rapid dipstick antigen-capture assay. Lancet 343: 564568.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Tanyuksel M, Petri WA Jr, 2003. Laboratory diagnosis of amebiasis. Clin Microbiol Rev 16: 713729.

  • 13.

    Mak GC et al., 2020. Evaluation of rapid antigen test for detection of SARS-CoV-2 virus. J Clin Virol 129: 104500.

  • 14.

    Abeijon C et al., 2020. Urine-based antigen detection assay for diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis using monoclonal antibodies specific for six protein biomarkers of Leishmania infantum/Leishmania donovani. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 14: e0008246.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    Abeijon C et al., 2019. Development of a multiplexed assay for detection of Leishmania donovani and Leishmania infantum protein biomarkers in urine samples of patients with visceral leishmaniasis. J Clin Microbiol 57: e02076e02018. doi: .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Abeijon C, Campos-Neto A, 2013. Potential non-invasive urine-based antigen (protein) detection assay to diagnose active visceral leishmaniasis. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7: e2161e2164.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Abeijon C et al., 2016. Immunogenicity in dogs and protection against visceral leishmaniasis induced by a 14kDa Leishmania infantum recombinant polypeptide. Trials Vaccinol 5: 17.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Otranto D et al., 2009. Toward diagnosing Leishmania infantum infection in asymptomatic dogs in an area where leishmaniasis is endemic. Clin Vaccine Immunol 16: 337343.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Solano-Gallego L et al., 2011. LeishVet guidelines for the practical management of canine leishmaniosis. Parasit Vectors 4: 86.

  • 20.

    Abeijon C, Singh OP, Chakravarty J, Sundar S, Campos-Neto A, 2016. Novel antigen detection assay to monitor therapeutic efficacy of visceral leishmaniasis. Am J Trop Med Hyg 95: 800802.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
 
 
 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment of a New Antigen Detection Test for the Diagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

View More View Less
  • 1 DetectoGen Inc., Westborough, Massachusetts;
  • | 2 Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, Massachusetts

ABSTRACT.

Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is a serious zoonotic disease in Brazil and Southern Europe. CVL is primarily caused by Leishmania infantum and its diagnosis relies largely on detection of parasites in bone marrow or lymph node aspirates by microscopic observation of the parasites in stained smears, parasite culture, or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Serological tests exist but they do not distinguish active disease from simple exposure to parasite antigens. Here, we have assessed the utility of a new monoclonal antibody––based antigen (protein) detection test for the diagnosis of CVL. The test was positive in 70% of beagle dogs experimentally infected with L. infantum. In contrast, culture of the parasites from bone marrow aspirates was positive in only 40% of the infected animals. These preliminary results suggest that this antigen detection test, which we have recently described for the diagnosis of human VL, has the potential to be a useful diagnostic tool for CVL.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Antonio Campos-Neto, DetectoGen Inc., 5 Jacob Amsden Rd., Westborough, MA 01581. E-mail: acampos@detectogen.com

Authors’ addresses: Claudia Abeijon, DetectoGen Inc., Westborough, MA, E-mail: cabeijon@detectogen.com. Stefano Pizzirani, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA, E-mail: stefano.pizzirani@tufts.edu. Antonio Campos-Neto, DetectoGen Inc., Westborough, MA, and Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, North Grafton, MA, E-mail: acampos@detectogen.com.

Save