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Are Dawn Collections of Anopheles stephensi a Better Method To Estimate the Resting Vector Density? A Study from Chennai, India

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  • 1 ICMR - National Institute of Malaria Research, Field Unit, Chennai, India;
  • | 2 Department of Zoology, Madras Christian College, Chennai, India;
  • | 3 Regional Office for Health and Family Welfare, Chennai, India
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ABSTRACT.

The study was an attempt to capture Anopheles stephensi from cattle sheds during dawn to understand the realistic density of the resting mosquitoes. A 2-year longitudinal study was carried out in cattle sheds in close proximity to the human dwellings to collect the resting vector mosquitoes. The man-hour density of An. stephensi ranged from 24.7 to 206.5. The vector incrimination results indicated 0.15% of An. stephensi infected with Pv210 in 2015 and 0.09% in 2016. The current study indicated that cattle sheds are still the preferred resting place of An. stephensi and that dawn is the perfect time to collect and estimate its densities. Hence, adult vector control may also be given due importance in addition to the routine larval source management measures to curb malaria transmission in an urban setting.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Alex Eapen, ICMR - National Institute of Malaria Research, NIE Campus, 2nd Main Road, TNHB, Ayapakkam, Chennai- 600 077, India. E-mail: alexeapen@yahoo.com

Financial support: The work was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH Grant U19AI089676. The content of this manuscript is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Authors’ addresses: Sangamithra Ravishankaran, Aswin Asokan, and Shalu Thomas, ICMR - National Institute of Malaria Research, Field Unit, NIE Campus, Ayapakkam, Chennai, India, E-mails: vr.sangamithra@gmail.com, ashwinviro@gmail.com, and jyshalu@gmail.com. N. Johnson Amala Justin, Regional Office for Health and Family Welfare, Rajaji Bhavan, Besant Nagar, Chennai, India, E-mail: johnsonamalajustin@gmail.com. Manu Thomas Mathai, Department of Zoology, Madras Christian College, Tambaram, Chennai, India, E-mail: manuthomasmcc@gmail.com.

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