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Palmoplantar Involvement in Leprosy: A Clinicopathological Study

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  • 1 Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India;
  • 2 Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India

ABSTRACT

Palmoplantar involvement has been infrequently reported in leprosy and is an easily misdiagnosed entity. The institutional database of leprosy clinic from 2015 to 2018 was accessed. Details pertaining to demography, clinical presentation, comorbidities (if any), treatment received, and outcome were analyzed in leprosy patients with palmoplantar involvement. Among the 520 patients studied, the involvement of palms and/or soles was reported in 49 (9.4%) patients. Isolated palm involvement was the most frequent (26/49, 53.1%), followed by both palm and sole involvement (12/49, 24.5%) and sole involvement alone (11/49, 22.4%). A higher incidence of lepra reactions and disabilities was noted in patients with palmoplantar involvement than in those without (P < 0.0001). Palmoplantar involvement in leprosy, although uncommon, is associated with a higher risk of reactions and disabilities. A knowledge of this aspect of leprosy can help in maintaining a high index of suspicion and reduce misdiagnosis.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Tarun Narang, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Sector 12, Chandigarh 160012, India. E-mail: narangtarun@yahoo.co.in

Acknowledgments: The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) assisted with publication expenses.

Authors’ addresses: Garima Dabas, Tarun Narang, and Sunil Dogra, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India, E-mails: drgarimadabas@gmail.com, narangtarun@yahoo.co.in, and sundogra@hotmail.com. Divya Aggarwal and Bishan Das Radotra, Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India, E-mails: divya.lh.1@gmail.com and bishanradotra@gmail.com.

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