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Chagas Disease in the United States: A Perspective on Diagnostic Testing Limitations and Next Steps

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  • 1 Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts;
  • 2 Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts;
  • 3 Center for Infectious Diseases, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts;
  • 4 Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts;
  • 5 Latin American Society of Chagas (LASOCHA), Medstar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland;
  • 6 Department of Epidemiology, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina;
  • 7 Department of Pediatrics, Section of Pediatric Tropical Medicine, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, Texas;
  • 8 Center of Excellence for Chagas Disease at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, California;
  • 9 Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland

ABSTRACT

Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease that affects an estimated 300,000 people in the United States. This perspective piece reviews diagnostic challenges and proposes next steps to address these shortfalls.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Natasha S. Hochberg, Boston University School of Medicine, 801 Massachusetts Ave., Crosstown 2012, Boston, MA 02118. E-mail: nhoch@bu.edu

Authors’ addresses: Natasha S. Hochberg, Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, and Center for Infectious Diseases, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, E-mail: nhoch@bu.edu. Alyse Wheelock, Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, and Center for Infectious Diseases, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, E-mail: alyse.wheelock@bmc.org. Davidson H. Hamer, Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, Center for Infectious Diseases, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, and Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, E-mail: dhamer@bu.edu. Rachel Marcus, Latin American Society of Chagas (LASOCHA), Medstar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, MD, E-mail: rmarcus_99@yahoo.com. Melissa S. Nolan, Department of Epidemiology, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, and Department of Pediatrics, Section of Pediatric Tropical Medicine, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, E-mail: msnolan@mailbox.sc.edu. Sheba Meymandi, Center of Excellence for Chagas Disease at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, E-mail: smeymandi@dhs.lacounty.gov. Robert H. Gilman, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, E-mail: gilmanbob@gmail.com.

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