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Influence of Perception of Family Support and Functioning on Adolescent High-Risk Sexual Behavior

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  • 1 Department of Community Medicine, Babcock University, Ilishan, Nigeria;
  • 2 Centre for Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Sagamu, Nigeria;
  • 3 Department of Ophthalmology, Babcock University, Ilishan, Nigeria;
  • 4 Department of Family Medicine, Babcock University, Ilishan, Nigeria

ABSTRACT

Adolescents often engage in high-risk behaviors which often have lifelong consequences. It is unclear whether an association exists between adolescents’ perception of family support and family functioning and sexual risk behavior. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 702 adolescent students (aged 15–19 years) of a university in Nigeria and assessed high-risk sexual behavior (HRSB) and their judgment of family functioning and support. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to evaluate the relationship between HRSB and the perception of family support and functioning. We found that 114 (16.2%, 95% CI: 13.69–19.16) of the adolescents engaged in HRSB. A higher proportion of boys (22.7%, 95% CI: 17.79–28.47) than girls (12.93, 95% CI: 10.17–16.31) engaged in HRSB (P = 0.001). The prevalence of intimate partner violence in our study was 8% (95% CI: 6.19–10.29). Participants with lower perception scores were more likely to be engaged in HRSB (aOR: 0.920, 95% CI: 0.878–0.965). Likewise, the perception of family functioning was inversely related to HRSB among the participants (aOR: 0.884, 95% CI: 0.813–0.962). There is an association between adolescents’ perception of family support and functioning and HRSB. This association may provide a link in the complex interaction between the role of the family and adolescent sexuality. Programs and interventions for preventing HRSB and promoting risk-reducing autonomous decision-making among adolescents should include context- and setting-specific interventions that improve family support and functioning, and those that target in dysfunctional family settings.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Olumide Abiodun, Department of Community Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences, Babcock University, Ilishan, Nigeria. E-mail: olumiabiodun@gmail.com

Disclosure: The datasets generated and analyzed during the current study will be available on reasonable request to the authors from the ResearchGate repository (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Olumide_Abiodun). We obtained written informed consent from all the participants. We also got authorization from the parents or guardians (someone who has legal authority over the adolescent) of participants who were younger than 18 years. We received ethics approval for the research protocol from the Babcock University Human Research Ethics Committee (BUHREC/552/18). We conducted the interview sessions privately and handled data confidentially. We de-identified and restricted access to all the data. We then encrypted electronic data and stored them securely. De-identified data will be made available on reasonable request from the lead author, who is required to obtain the consent of the other authors before granting such requests. We performed our study in compliance with all the relevant guidelines and regulations.

Authors’ addresses: Olumide Abiodun, Department of Community Medicine, Benjamin S. Carson (Snr.) School of Medicine, Babcock University, Ilishan, Nigeria, and Department of Community Medicine, Babcock University Teaching Hospital, Ilishan, Nigeria, E-mail: olumiabiodun@gmail.com. Kolawole Sodeinde, Omodele Jagun, Akindele Ladele, Akinmade Adepoju, Faith Ohiaogu, Omolola Adelowo, Opeyemi Ojinni, John Adekeye, Olufunke Bankole, and Fortunate Mbonu, Department of Community Medicine, Babcock University Benjamin S Carson Senior School of Medicine, Ilishan, Nigeria, E-mails: kolawolesodeinde024@gmail.com, omodelly@yahoo.com, kolade0909@gmail.com, a_adepoju@hotmail.co.uk, faithfay84@gmail.com, adelowoomolola@gmail.com, talk2yetundeojinni@gmail.com, johnadekeye05@gmail.com, olufunkeabankole@gmail.com, and fortunatembonu@gmail.com.

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