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Case Report: Rhinosporidiosis Literature Review

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  • 1 Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Erasmo Meoz Hospital Colombia, University of Pamplona, Cúcuta, Colombia;
  • 2 Pediatric Resident at El Bosque University, Cucuta, Bogota, Medellin, Colombia;
  • 3 Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of Antioquia, Cardiovid Clinic, Medellín, Colombia

ABSTRACT

Rhinosporidiosis is caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi, a pathogen currently considered a fungus-like parasite of the eukaryotic group Mesomycetozoea. It is usually a benign condition, with slow growth of polypoid lesions, with involvement of the nose, nasopharynx, or eyes. The clinical characteristics of a painless, friable, polypoid mass, usually unilateral, can guide the diagnosis, but the gold standard for diagnosis is histopathological findings. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathobiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic strategies, and treatment approach for rhinosporidiosis.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Andrés F. Arias, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Erasmo Meoz Hospital Colombia, Cúcuta 050026, Colombia. E-mail: felipe_arias4@hotmail.com

Authors’ addresses: Andrés F. Arias, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Erasmo Meoz Hospital Colombia, Cúcuta, Colombia, Pediatric Infectious diseases, CES University, Medellin, Colombia, and Medical Duarte Clinic, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Cúcuta, Colombia, E-mail: felipe_arias4@hotmail.com. Sergio D. Romero, Pediatric Resident at El Bosque University, Bogotá, Colombia, E-mail: sdromero@unbosque.edu.co. Carlos G. Garcés, University of Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia, E-mail: calichegarces@hotmail.com.

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