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Assessment of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices about Visceral Leishmaniasis in Endemic Areas of Malda District, West Bengal, India

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  • 1 Department of Social Work, Visva Bharati University, Bolpur, West Bengal;
  • 2 Department of Microbiology, Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata, India;
  • 3 Department of Zoology, P. R. Thakur Government College, Thakurnagar, India;
  • 4 Department of Tropical Medicine, Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata, India

ABSTRACT

Community participation is an important aspect for the success of kala-azar (KA) elimination program implemented in five Southeast Asian countries by the WHO. The participation of community depends on the level of knowledge of, attitude toward, and practice around risk factors associated with KA transmission among the population. We assessed the knowledge, attitude, and practice toward KA elimination in endemic areas of Malda district, West Bengal, India. A total of 709 individuals from different villages of 12 sub-centers were interviewed during April–July 2019. Data were recorded in a structured questionnaire under four categories: sociodemographic parameters, knowledge, attitude, and practice. The association of dependent variables such as knowledge, attitude, and practice with independent variables such as the economy and sociodemographic parameters was analyzed by binary logistic regression model and chi-square test using SPSS software. Despite the endemicity of the disease for a long time, the adequacy of knowledge about the disease was found to be poor that can be attributed to low education level and socioeconomic status, but the attitude and practices were good. So, there is a scope of improvement in knowledge of the disease through proper health education. This will further improve the level of attitude and practices that will be helpful for the smooth implementation of different activities of the program by more active participation of the community.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Moytrey Chatterjee, Department of Microbiology, Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, 108, C R Avenue, Kolkata 700073, India. E-mail: moytreychatterjee@yahoo.in

Authors’ addresses: Ushnish Guha, Department of Social Work, Visva-Bharati University, Bolpur, India, E-mail: ushnishguha@gmail.com. Moytrey Chatterjee, Ashif Ali Sardar, Kingsuk Jana, and Ardhendu Kumar Maji, Department of Microbiology, Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata, India, E-mails: moytreychatterjee@yahoo.in, ashifbappa786@gmail.com, kingsukjana11@gmail.com, and maji_ardhendu@yahoo.com. Pabitra Saha, Department of Zoology, P. R. Thakur Government College, Thakurnagar, India. E-mail: pabitra.saha82@gmail.com. Subhasish Kamal Guha, Department of Tropical Medicine, Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata, India, E-mail: drskguha@gmail.com.

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