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Case Report: Erysipeloid Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Treated with Oral Miltefosine

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  • 1 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National Academy of Medical Sciences, Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal;
  • 2 Department of Pathology, National Academy of Medical Sciences, Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal

ABSTRACT

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) can present with various skin lesions ranging from a single ulcer to diffuse multiple nodules. Here, we present a case of a 67-year-old man with a large erythematous well-defined indurated plaque over the left face for a duration of 4 months. A slit skin smear was performed, and it was stained with Giemsa stain which showed multiple amastigotes confirming the diagnosis of CL. Oral miltefosine was started at a dose of 150 mg/day but had to be stopped after 20 days as the patient developed diarrhea, bipedal edema, and renal impairment. This case emphasizes an uncommon variant of CL and the role of systemic treatment with oral miltefosine and its associated adverse effects.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Niraj Parajuli, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National Academy of Medical Sciences, Bir Hospital, Mahaboudha, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal. E-mail: drnirajparajuli@gmail.com

Authors’ addresses: Niraj Parajuli, Sabeena Adhikary, and Anupama Karki, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National Academy of Medical Sciences, Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal, E-mails: drnirajparajuli@gmail.com, sabeena.adhikary55@gmail.com, and anupama.karki@gmail.com. Sumida Tiwari, Department of Pathology, National Academy of Medical Sciences, Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal, E-mail: deepsumida@gmail.com.

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