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Vector Competence of Aedes aegypti Populations from Entebbe, Uganda, for Zika Virus

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  • 1 Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Fort Collins, Colorado;
  • 2 Department of Arbovirology, Uganda Virus Research Institute, Entebbe, Uganda

ABSTRACT

We evaluated the vector competence of three strains of Aedes aegypti formosus from Entebbe, Uganda, for Zika virus (ZIKV). The aim was to find out if these strains were competent or incompetent vectors for ZIKV, to explain the lack of ZIKV outbreaks in the city of Entebbe. We observed transmission rates ranging from 33% to 78%; however, these rates were not statistically significantly different, suggesting that there were no real differences among the strains. Nonetheless, this showed that populations of Ae. aegypti formosus in Entebbe are competent vectors for ZIKV. The reason why there is no detectable transmission of ZIKV to humans in Entebbe is currently unknown. The lack of detectable transmission despite Ae. aegypti formosus competence for ZIKV suggests that other parameters, such as preference for nonhuman blood, may be limiting its ability to serve as a vector.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to John-Paul Mutebi, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3156 Rampart Road, Fort Collins, CO 80521. E-mail: grv0@dc.gov

Authors’ addresses: John-Paul Mutebi, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Arboviral Disease Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Fort Collins, CO, E-mail: grv0@cdc.gov. Julius J. Lutwama, Department of Arbovirology, Uganda Virus Research Institute, Entebbe, Uganda, E-mail: jjlutwama03@yahoo.com.

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