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Lassa Fever: An Evolving Emergency in West Africa

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  • 1 Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts;
  • | 2 Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts;
  • | 3 Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Kwara;
  • | 4 Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

ABSTRACT

Lassa fever remains endemic in parts of West Africa and continues to pose as a quiescent threat globally. We described the background on Lassa fever, factors contributing to its emergence and spread, preventive measures, and potential solutions. This review provides a holistic and comprehensive source for academicians, clinicians, researchers, policymakers, infectious disease epidemiologists, virologists, and other stakeholders.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Oluwafemi O. Balogun, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 305 South Street, Boston, MA 02130. E-mail: oluwafemi.o.balogun@mass.gov

Authors’ addresses: Oluwafemi O. Balogun, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Bureau of Infectious Diseases and Laboratory Services, Office of Integrated Surveillance and Informatics Services, Boston, MA, and Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, E-mail: oluwafemi.o.balogun@mass.gov. Oluwatosin W. Akande, Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, E-mail: akande.wuraola@gmail.com. Davidson H. Hamer, Infectious Diseases, Boston University Medical Campus, Boston, MA, and Global Health and Infectious Disease, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, E-mail: dhamer@bu.edu.

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