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Zoonotic Helminthiases in Rodents (Bandicota indica, Bandicota savilei, and Leopoldamys edwardsi) from Vientiane Capital, Lao PDR

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  • 1 Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand;
  • | 2 Department of Medical Laboratory, Faculty of Medical Technology, University of Health Sciences, Vientiane, Lao PDR;
  • | 3 Neglected, Zoonosis and Vector-Borne Disease Research Group, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand

ABSTRACT

Zoonotic helminths of three rodent species, Bandicota indiaca, Bandicota savilei, and Leopoldamys edwardsi, were investigated in Vientiane capital, Lao PDR. A total of 310 rodents were infected with 11 species of helminth parasites. There were 168 (54.2%) of 310 rodents infected with zoonotic helminths. From our results, there are six recorded zoonotic helminth species, and the highest prevalence was exhibited by Raillietina sp. (30.7%), followed by Hymenolepis diminuta (17.7%), Hymenolepis nana (2.6%), Echinostoma ilocanum (1.9%), Echinostoma malayanum (1.3%), and Angiostrongylus cantonensis (1%). This is the first study of zoonotic helminths in L. edwardsi and the first report of H. diminuta, H. nana, E. ilocanum, and E. malayanum in Bandicota indica and B. savilei, and the first demonstration of A. cantonenensis in B. indica in Lao PDR. From our results, these three rodents are potentially important reservoir hosts of zoonotic helminths. Thus, effective control programs should be considered for implementation to prevent the transmission of these zoonoses in this area.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Porntip Laummaunwai, Khon Kaen University, 123 Mittraphap Road, 40002 Khon Kaen, Thailand. E-mail: porlau@kku.ac.th

Disclosure: This study was supported in part by the Faculty of Medicine of Khon Kaen University and the Department of Medical Laboratory, Faculty of Medical Technology, University of Health Science, Lao PDR.

Authors’ addresses: Phaviny Sithay, Thaksaporn Thongseesuksai, Thidarut Boonmars, and Porntip Laummaunwai, Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand, E-mails: phavist999@hotmail.com, thaksaporn.t@kkumail.com, bthida@kku.ac.th, and porlau@kku.ac.th. Somphonephet Chanthavong, Onekham Savongsy, and Naly Khaminsou, Department of Medical Laboratory, Faculty of Medical Technology, University of Health Sciences, Vientiane, Lao PDR, E-mails: phet2chanthavong@hotmail.com, onekham9876@gmail.com, and khaminsou@hotmail.com.

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