• 1.

    Deplazes P et al. 2017. Global distribution of alveolar and cystic echinococcosis. Adv Parasitol 95: 315493.

  • 2.

    Romig T, Deplazes P, Jenkins D, Giraudoux P, Massolo A, Craig PS, Wassermann M, Takahashi K, de la Rue M, 2017. Ecology and life cycle patterns of echinococcus species. Adv Parasitol 95: 213314.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Budke CM, Deplazes P, Torgerson PR, 2006. Global socioeconomic impact of cystic echinococcosis. Emerg Infect Dis 12: 296303.

  • 4.

    WHO, 2020. Neglected Tropical Diseases. Available at: https://www.who.int/neglected_diseases/diseases/en/. Accessed February 2, 2020.

  • 5.

    Junghanss T, da Silva AM, Horton J, Chiodini PL, Brunetti E, 2008. Clinical management of cystic echinococcosis: state of the art, problems, and perspectives. Am J Trop Med Hyg 79: 301311.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Manciulli T, Mariconti M, Vola A, Lissandrin R, Brunetti E, 2017. Cystic echinococcosis in the Mediterranean. Curr Trop Med Rep 4: 235244.

  • 7.

    Lopez-Bernus A, Belhassen-García M, Alonso-Sardón M, Carpio-Perez A, Velasco-Tirado V, Romero-Alegria Á, Muro A, Cordero-Sánchez M, Pardo-Lledias J, 2015. Surveillance of human echinococcosis in Castilla-Leon (Spain) between 2000–2012. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 9: e0004154.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Herrador Z, Siles-Lucas M, Aparicio P, Lopez-Velez R, Gherasim A, Garate T, Benito A, 2016. Cystic echinococcosis epidemiology in Spain based on hospitalization records, 1997–2012. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 10: e0004942.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Brundu D, Piseddu T, Stegel G, Masu G, Ledda S, Masala G, 2014. Acta tropica retrospective study of human cystic echinococcosis in Italy based on the analysis of hospital discharge records between 2001 and 2012. Acta Trop 140: 9196.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    van Cauteren D, Millon L, de Valk H, Grenouillet F, 2016. Retrospective study of human cystic echinococcosis over the past decade in France, using a nationwide hospital medical information database. Parasitol Res 115: 42614265.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Carabin H, Balsera-Rodríguez FJ, Rebollar-Sáenz J, Benner CT, Benito A, Fernández-Crespo JC, Carmena D, 2014. Cystic echinococcosis in the province of Álava, north Spain: the monetary burden of a disease no longer under surveillance. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 8: e3069.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Mastrandrea S, Stegel G, Piseddu T, Ledda S, Masala G, 2012. A retrospective study on burden of human echinococcosis based on hospital discharge records from 2001 to 2009 in Sardinia, Italy. Acta Trop 123: 184189.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Cappello E, Cacopardo B, Caltabiano E, Li Volsi S, Chiara R, Sapienza M, Nigro L, 2013. Epidemiology and clinical features of cystic hydatidosis in western Sicily: a ten-year review. World J Gastroenterol 19: 93519358.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Lissandrin R, Vola A, Tahiri S, Mariconti M, Manciulli T, Tamarozzi F, Brunetti E, 2018. Cystic echinococcosis in immigrants and Italians accessing a single referral center in Lombardy, Italy. Trav Med Infect Dis 32.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    Petrone L et al. 2013. Cystic echinococcosis in a single tertiary care center in Rome, Italy. Biomed Res Int 2013: 978146.

  • 16.

    Escolà-Vergé L et al. 2019. Retrospective study of cystic echinococcosis in a recent cohort of a referral center for liver surgery. J Gastrointest Surg 23: 11481156.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Romero-Alegria A, Belhassen-García M, Alonso-Sardón M, Velasco-Tirado V, Lopez-Bernus A, Carpio-Pérez A, Bellido JLM, Muro A, Cordero M, Pardo-Lledias J, 2017. Imported cystic echinococcosis in western Spain: a retrospective study. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 110: 664669.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Zammarchi L, Vellere I, Stella L, Bartalesi F, Strohmeyer M, Bartoloni A, 2017. Spectrum and burden of neglected tropical diseases observed in an infectious and tropical diseases unit in Florence, Italy (2000–2015). Intern Emerg Med 12: 467477.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Gironé G, Mateo C, Gaya V, Usó J, Mínguez C, Roca B, Ramos JM, 2015. Admissions for imported and non-imported parasitic diseases at a general hospital in Spain: a retrospective analysis. Travel Med Infect Dis 13: 322328.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    David Morais JA, 2007. Human hydatidosis in the district of Evora, Portugal: a clinical-epidemiological study over a quarter of a century. Acta Med Port 20: 110.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    Tamarozzi F et al. 2018. Prevalence of abdominal cystic echinococcosis in rural Bulgaria, Romania, and Turkey: a cross-sectional, ultrasound-based, population study from the HERACLES project. Lancet Infect Dis 18: 769778.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    Chebli H et al. 2017. Human cystic echinococcosis in Morocco: ultrasound screening in the Mid Atlas through an Italian-Moroccan partnership. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 11: e0005384.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23.

    Loi F, Laddomada A, Coccollone A, Marrocu E, Piseddu T, Masala G, Bandino E, Cappai S, Rolesu S, 2019. Socio-economic factors as indicators for various animal diseases in Sardinia. PLoS One 14: e0217367.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24.

    Colombe S, Togami E, Gelaw F, Antillon M, Fuentes R, Weinberger DM. 2017. Trends and correlates of cystic echinococcosis in Chile: 2001–2012. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 11: 20012012.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    Brunetti E, Kern P, Vuitton DA, 2010. Expert consensus for the diagnosis and treatment of cystic and alveolar echinococcosis in humans. Acta Trop 114: 116.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26.

    Brunetti E, Garcia HH, Junghanss T, 2011. Cystic echinococcosis: chronic, complex, and still neglected. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 5: 37.

  • 27.

    MacPherson CN, Romig T, Zeyhle E, Rees PH, Were JB, 1987. Portable ultrasound scanner versus serology in screening for hydatid cysts in a nomadic population. Lancet 2: 259261.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28.

    WHO, 2012. Echinococcosis - Epidemiology. Available at: https://www.who.int/echinococcosis/epidemiology/en/. Accessed February 2, 2020.

  • 29.

    Nabarro LE, Amin Z, Chiodini PL. 2015. Current management of cystic echinococcosis: a survey of specialist practice. Clin Infect Dis 60: 721728.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 30.

    Narra R, Maestri M, Budke CM, Tamarozzi F, Mariconti M, Nicoletti GJ, Rinaldi F, Brunetti E. 2016. Costs associated with surgically treated cases of abdominal cystic echinococcosis: a single center’s experience from 2008 to 2014, Pavia, Italy. Am J Trop Med Hyg 95: 405409.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 31.

    Vola A, Manciulli T, De Silvestri A, Lissandrin R, Mariconti M, Siles-Lucas M, Brunetti E, Tamarozzi F, 2019. Diagnostic performances of commercial ELISA, indirect hemagglutination, and western blot in differentiation of hepatic echinococcal and non-echinococcal lesions: a retrospective analysis of data from a single referral centre. Am J Trop Med Hyg 101: 13451349.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 32.

    Caremani M, Maestrini R, Occhini U, Sassoli S, Accorsi A, Giorgio A, Filice C. 1993. Echographic epidemiology of cystic hydatid disease in Italy. Eur J Epidemiol 9: 401404.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 33.

    Rossi P, Tamarozzi F, Galati F, Pozio E, Akhan O, Cretu CM, Vutova K, Siles-Lucas M, Brunetti E, Casulli A, 2016. HERACLES extended network. The first meeting of the European Register of Cystic Echinococcosis (ERCE). Parasit Vectors 9: 243.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 34.

    EFSA, 2019. The European Union One Health 2018 zoonoses report. EFSA J 17: 5926.

 
 
 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evidence of Low Prevalence of Cystic Echinococcosis in the Catanzaro Province, Calabria Region, Italy

View More View Less
  • 1 Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, Pavia, Italy;
  • | 2 PhD School of Experimental Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy;
  • | 3 Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy;
  • | 4 Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, “Magna Graecia” University, Catanzaro, Italy;
  • | 5 Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Naples-Federico II, Napoli, Italy;
  • | 6 Institute of Clinical Infectious Disease, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy;
  • | 7 Public Health Agency of the Catanzaro Province, Catanzaro, Italy;
  • | 8 Department of Health Sciences, Unit of Clinical Microbiology, ‘Magna Graecia’ University, Catanzaro, Italy;
  • | 9 Department of Infectious Diseases, WHO Collaborating Centre for Epidemiology, Detection and Control of Cystic and Alveolar Echinococcosis, Foodborne and Neglected Parasitic Diseases Unit, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy;
  • | 10 Department of Infectious Diseases, European Reference Laboratory for Parasites, Foodborne and Neglected Parasitic Diseases Unit, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy

ABSTRACT

Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is one of the neglected tropical diseases recognized by the WHO. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato affects more than 1 million people worldwide and is responsible for high costs in the healthcare system. A clear knowledge of the prevalence of CE and its clinical characteristics could have an important impact on the approach to its diagnosis and to the public health planning of treatment and control interventions. We performed a prevalence study in four municipalities of Catanzaro Province, South Italy. This area is considered to be at high risk of CE because of ovine breeding. We screened by abdominal ultrasound 2,426 volunteers, four of whom had abdominal CE. Given the need for prevention and control programs for CE in endemic areas of Italy, a detailed mapping of prevalence of CE, to complement data obtained through hospital discharge records, appears imperative.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Tommaso Manciulli, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, PhD School of Experimental Medicine, Viale Brambilla 54, Pavia 27100, Italy. E-mail: tommaso.manciulli01@universitadipavia.it

Financial support: This research was funded by ERANet L. A. C. (grant ELAC2015/T080544 to E. B. and A. C.) and the Italian Ministry of Health—NDTND project.

Authors’ addresses: Tommaso Manciulli, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, Pavia, Italy, and Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, PhD School of Experimental Medicine, Pavia, Italy, E-mail: tommaso.manciulli01@ateneopv.it. Riccardo Serraino, Enrico Maria Trecarichi, Maria Mazzitelli and Carlo Torti, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, “Magna Graecia” University, Catanzaro, Italy, E-mails: riccardoserraino@hotmail.it, em.trecarichi@unicz.it, m.mazzitelli88@gmail.com and torti@unicz.it. Gian Luca D’Alessandro, Roberta Narra, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Science, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, E-mails: gianluca.dalessandro01@ateneopv.it, robintells@hotmail.it. Letizia Cattaneo, Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Naples-Federico II, Napoli, Italy, E-mail: letizia.cattaneo@gmail.com. Mara Mariconti and Ambra Vola, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, Pavia, Italy, E-mails: maramariconti@libero.it and ambrvola@gmail.com. Francesco Taccari, Institute of Clinical Infectious Disease, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, E-mail: taccari@hotmail.it. Giuseppe De Vito, Public Health Agency of the Catanzaro Province, Catanzaro, Italy, E-mail: giuseppe.devito@asp.cz.it. Giovanni Matera and Nadia Marascio, Department of Health Sciences, Unit of Clinical Microbiology, “Magna Graecia” University, Catanzaro, Italy, E-mails: gm4106@gmail.com and nadiamarascio@gmail.com. Adriano Casulli, Department of Infectious Diseases, WHO Collaborating Centre for Epidemiology, Detection and Control of Cystic and Alveolar Echinococcosis, Foodborne and Neglected Parasitic Diseases Unit, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy, and Department of Infectious Diseases, European Reference Laboratory for Parasites, Foodborne and Neglected Parasitic Diseases Unit, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy, E-mail: adriano.casulli@iss.it. Enrico Brunetti, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, Pavia, Italy and Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Science, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy, E-mail: enrico.brunetti@unipv.it. Francesca Tamarozzi, Department of Infectious Diseases, WHO Collaborating Centre for Epidemiology, Detection and Control of Cystic and Alveolar Echinococcosis, Foodborne and Neglected Parasitic Diseases Unit, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy, E-mail: f_tamarozzi@yahoo.com.

These authors contributed equally to this work.

Save