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Opisthorchis viverrini Infection Augments the Severity of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in High-Fat/High-Fructose Diet–Fed Hamsters

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  • 1 Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand;
  • | 2 Chronic Kidney Disease Prevention in The Northeast of Thailand (CKDNET) Working Group, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand;
  • | 3 Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand;
  • | 4 Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand;
  • | 5 Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand;
  • | 6 Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand;
  • | 7 Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand;
  • | 8 Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, and Research Center for Neglected Diseases of Poverty, School of Medicine & Health Sciences, The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia

The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing worldwide, including in regions where helminth infections such as the fish-borne liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini (Ov) also occur. We investigated the effects of a high-fat and high-fructose (HFF) diet on the development and progression of NAFLD in experimental opisthorchiasis. Two groups of hamsters were infected with Ov for 4 months before the experiment to induce chronic inflammation. One of these groups (OvHFF) was fed with a HFF diet for up to further 4 months. One uninfected group of hamsters served as the normal control group, and another received the HFF diet (HFF group) for up to 4 months. Histopathology, biochemical parameters, and ultrastructural features of liver were investigated. In a short-term treatment, the OvHFF group showed significantly better homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance level and lower liver lipid than did the HFF group. By contrast, histopathological characteristics of severe NAFLD were prominent in the OvHFF group after 4 months on the HFF diet, findings which were supported by confirmatory ultrastructural changes. In conclusion, opisthorchiasis induced the severe NAFLD in hamsters fed high-fat/high-fructose diets.

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Author Notes

Address correspondence to Somchai Pinlaor, Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 4002, Thailand. E-mail: psomec@kku.ac.th

Financial support: The Thailand Research Fund (RSA5780046) (S. P.) supported this project. A. C. is a graduate student supported by the Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Ph.D.-M.D. Program, and the Thailand Research Fund and Khon Kaen University through the Royal Golden Jubilee Ph.D. Program (grant number PHD/0011/2555) (to A. C. and S. P.) and Invitation Research Fund and Research assistant, the Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Thailand (IN59158).

Authors’ addresses: Apisit Chaidee, Sudarat Onsurathum, Kitti Intuyod, Ornuma Haonon, and Somchai Pinlaor, Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand, E-mails: apisit.chaidee@gmail.com, onsurathum.s@gmail.com, kitti.i@kkumail.com, ornuma_hao@kkumail.com, and psomec@kku.ac.th. Patchareewan Pannangpetch, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand, E-mail: patc_pan@kku.ac.th. Chatlert Pongchaiyakul, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand, E-mail: pchatl@kku.ac.th. Porntip Pinlaor, Center for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand, E-mail: porawa@kku.ac.th. Chawalit Pairojkul, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand, E-mail: chawalit.pjk2011@gmail.com. Jariya Umka Welbat, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand, E-mail: jariya_umka@yahoo.com. Wannaporn Ittiprasert, Christina J. Cochran, Victoria H. Mann, and Paul J. Brindley, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, and Research Center for Neglected Diseases of Poverty, School of Medicine & Health Sciences, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, E-mails: wannaporni@gwu.edu, tinajcochran@hotmail.com, vmann@gwu.edu, and pbrindley@gwu.edu.

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