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TcTASV Antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi: Utility for Diagnosis and High Accuracy as Biomarkers of Treatment Efficacy in Pediatric Patients

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  • 1 Cátedra de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Salta, Argentina;
  • | 2 Instituto de Investigaciones de Enfermedades Tropicales (IIET), Sede Regional Orán, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Orán-Salta, Argentina;
  • | 3 Instituto de Patología Experimental (IPE-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Salta, Argentina;
  • | 4 Instituto de Investigaciones en Energía No Convencional (INENCO-CONICET), CCT-Salta, Salta, Argentina;
  • | 5 Instituto de Investigaciones Biotecnológicas “Dr. Rodolfo A. Ugalde” (IIBIO), Universidad Nacional de San Martín, UNSAM-CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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The discovery and characterization of novel parasite antigens to improve the diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi by serological methods and for accurate and rapid follow-up of treatment efficiency are still needed. TcTASV is a T. cruzi–specific multigene family, whose products are expressed on the parasite stages present in the vertebrate host. In a previous work, a mix of antigens from subfamilies TcTASV-A and TcTASV-C (Mix A + C) was sensitive and specific to identify dogs with active infection of high epidemiological relevance. Here, TcTASV-A and TcTASV-C were assayed separately as well as together (Mix A + C) in an ELISA format on human samples. The Mix A + C presented moderate sensitivity (78%) but high diagnostic accuracy with a 100% of specificity, evaluated on healthy, leishmaniasic, and Strongyloides stercoralis infected patients. Moreover, antibody levels of pediatric patients showed—2 years posttreatment—diminished reactivity against the Mix A + C (P < 0.0001), pointing TcTASV antigens as promising tools for treatment follow-up.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Valeria Tekiel, Instituto de Investigaciones Biotecnológicas “Dr. Rodolfo A. Ugalde”, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, UNSAM-CONICET, Av. 25 de Mayo y Francia, San Martín B1650KNA, Buenos Aires, Argentina. E-mails: valet@iib.unsam.edu.ar or vtekiel@gmail.com

Authors’ addresses: Noelia Floridia-Yapur, Cátedra de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Salta, Argentina, and Instituto de Investigaciones de Enfermedades Tropicales (IIET), Sede Regional Orán, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Orán-Salta, Argentina, E-mail: narfy89@gmail.com. Mercedes Monje-Rumi, Paula Ragone, Juan J. Lauthier, Nicolás Tomasini, Anahí Alberti D’Amato, Patricio Diosque, Instituto de Patología Experimental (IPE-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Salta, Argentina, E-mails: mariamercedes.mr@gmail.com, p_ragone@yahoo.com.ar, juanjoselauthier@gmail.com, biol.nicolas.tomasini@gmail.com, anahimaiten@gmail.com, and patricio.diosque@gmail.com. Rubén R. Cimino, Instituto de Investigaciones de Enfermedades Tropicales (IIET), Sede Regional Orán, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Orán-Salta, Argentina, E-mail: rubencimino@gmail.com. José F. Gil, Instituto de Investigaciones en Energía No Convencional (INENCO-CONICET), CCT-Salta, Salta, Argentina, E-mail: jgil.unsa@gmail.com. Daniel O. Sanchez and Valeria Tekiel, Instituto de Investigaciones Biotecnológicas “Dr. Rodolfo A. Ugalde” (IIBIO), Universidad Nacional de San Martín, UNSAM-CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina, E-mails: dsanchez21@gmail.com and valet@iib.unsam.edu.ar. Julio R. Nasser, Cátedra de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Salta, Argentina, E-mail: jrnasser@hotmail.com.

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