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Case Report: Imported Melioidosis from Goa, India to Israel, 2018

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  • 1 Infectious Diseases Unit, Assuta Ashdod University Hospital, Ashdod, Israel;
  • | 2 Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University in the Negev, Beer Sheba, Israel;
  • | 3 Microbiology Laboratory, Assuta Ashdod University Hospital, Ashdod, Israel;
  • | 4 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness-Ziona, Israel
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A previously healthy young man presented with a chronic cavitary pulmonary infection that began while in Goa, India. Burkholderia pseudomallei was cultured from sputum samples. The infection fully resolved after prolonged antibiotic treatment. Other than traveling during the monsoon season, extensive use of well-water for water-pipe smoking of cannabis was identified as a possible risk factor for infection. This is one of the first reports of travel-associated melioidosis from India. Genomic and immunological characterization suggested that the B. pseudomallei isolate collected from the reported case exhibited limited similarity to other B. pseudomallei strains.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Tal Brosh-Nissimov, Head of Infectious Diseases Unit, Assuta Ashdod University Hospital, Harefuah St. 7, Ashdod 7747629, Israel. E-mail: tbrosh@gmail.com

Authors’ addresses: Tal Brosh-Nissimov, Infectious Diseases Unit, Assuta Ashdod University Hospital, Ashdod, Israel, E-mail: tbrosh@gmail.com. Daniel Grupel and Shlomi Abuhasira, Infectious Diseases Unit, Assuta Ashdod University Hospital Harefuah, Ashdod, Israel, E-mails: danielg@assuta.co.il and shlomi.abouhassira@mail.huji.ac.il. Hanna Leskes, Microbiology Laboratory, Assuta Ashdod University Hospital, Ashdod, Israel, E-mail: hannal@assuta.co.il. Ma’ayan Israeli, Shirley Lazar, Uri Elia, Ofir Israeli, Adi Beth-Din, Erez Bar-Haim, Inbar Cohen-Gihon, Anat Zvi, Ofer Cohen, and Theodor Chitlaru, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness-Ziona, Israel, E-mail: maayani@iibr.gov.il, shirleyl@iibr.gov.il, urie@iibr.gov.il, ofiri@iibr.gov.il, adib@iibr.gov.il, erezb@iibr.gov.il, inbarg@iibr.gov.il, anatz@iibr.gov.il, oferc@iibr.gov.il, and theodorc@iibr.gov.il.

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