Evaluation of a Water and Hygiene Project in Health-Care Facilities in Siaya County, Kenya, 2016

William Davis Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Waterborne Diseases Prevention Branch, Atlanta, Georgia;

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Aloyce Odhiambo Safe Water and AIDS Project, Kisumu, Kenya;

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Jared Oremo Safe Water and AIDS Project, Kisumu, Kenya;

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Ronald Otieno Safe Water and AIDS Project, Kisumu, Kenya;

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Alex Mwaki Safe Water and AIDS Project, Kisumu, Kenya;

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Anu Rajasingham Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Emergency Recovery and Response Branch, Atlanta, Georgia;

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Sunkyung Kim Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Biostatistics and Information Management Office, Atlanta, Georgia

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Robert Quick Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Waterborne Diseases Prevention Branch, Atlanta, Georgia;

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To address water and hygiene infrastructure deficiencies in health-care facilities (HCFs) in Siaya County, Kenya, portable water stations, soap, and water treatment products were provided to 109 HCFs in 2005. In 2011 and again in 2016, we interviewed staff in 26 randomly selected HCFs, observed water sources, water stations, and tested source and stored water for chlorine residual and Escherichia coli. Of 26 HCFs, 22 (85%) had improved water supplies, and 22 (85%) had functioning handwashing and drinking water stations, but < 50% provided soap or water treatment. Thirteen (50%) of 26 source water samples yielded E. coli; 24 (92%) of 26 stored water samples yielded no E. coli, including nine with residual chlorine and nine untreated samples from sources yielding no E. coli. Eleven years after implementation, 85% of HCFs continued to use water stations that protected water from recontamination. Sustainable provision of soap and water treatment products could optimize intervention use.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to William Davis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Waterborne Diseases Prevention Branch, Atlanta, GA. E-mail: lyo0@cdc.gov

Authors’ addresses: William Davis and Robert Quick, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Waterborne Diseases Prevention Branch, Atlanta, GA, E-mails: lyo0cdc.gov and rxq1@cdc.gov. Aloyce Odhiambo, Jared Oremo, Ronald Otieno, and Alex Mwaki, Safe Water and AIDS Project, Kisumu, Kenya, E-mails: alloyceodhiambo@swapkenya.org, jared@swapkenya.org, ronotien0@yahoo.com, and alex@swapkenya.org. Anu Rajasingham, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Emergency Recovery and Response Branch, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: idb4@cdc.gov. Sunkyung Kim, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Biostatistics and Information Management Office, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: wox0@cdc.gov.

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