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Comparison of the Use of Serum and Plasma as Matrix Specimens in a Widely Used Noncommercial Dengue IgG ELISA

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  • 1 Modelling Evidence and Policy Group, School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom;
  • | 2 Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre, St. Kitts and Nevis
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Although sera are most commonly used in serological diagnostic tests for dengue, sometimes only plasma containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) may be available. When we studied the performance of a widely used noncommercial dengue ELISA in the detection of reactive IgG in sera and plasma from the same individuals, we found no significant differences in the diagnostic performance of the assay. The inter-specimen coefficient of variation (CV) of the optical density was 0.081 and the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was 0.92, showing a very strong agreement between the two matrix specimens. The intra-specimen CV and CCC were higher for plasma than for serum at low dilutions, but similar at high dilutions. Overall, our results show that the performance of a widely used in-house ELISA using plasma containing EDTA is equivalent to serum with the recommendation to assay the plasma specimens in duplicate to reduce variability of results at lower dilutions.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Iñaki Deza-Cruz, Modelling Evidence and Policy Group, School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Newcastle University, Claremont Rd., Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, United Kingdom. E-mail: i.deza-cruz@newcastle.ac.uk

Authors’ addresses: Iñaki Deza-Cruz, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom, and Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre, St. Kitts and Nevis, E-mail: inaki.deza@gmail.com. Aileen Mill and Steven Rushton, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom, E-mails: aileen.mill@newcastle.ac.uk and steven.rushton@newcastle.ac.uk. Patrick Kelly, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre, St. Kitts and Nevis, E-mail: pkelly@rossvet.edu.kn.

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