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Host Selection of Field-Collected Anopheles jeyporiensis and Anopheles nivipes in Bangladesh

Hasan Mohammad Al-AminInternational Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh;

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Mohammad Abdullah Heel KafiInternational Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh;

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Sumit ChakmaEngenderHealth Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh;

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Abu Naser MohonDepartment of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada;

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Wasif A. KhanInternational Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh;

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Rashidul HaqueInternational Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh;

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David J. Sullivan Jr.Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Baltimore, Maryland

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Douglas E. NorrisDepartment of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Baltimore, Maryland

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Mohammad Shafiul AlamInternational Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh;

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Anopheles jeyporiensis and Anopheles nivipes appear to play an important role in contemporary malaria transmission in Bangladesh. However, very little is known about the natural host selection of these vectors. Therefore, host selection of these two species was investigated in Bandarban, the most malarious region of Bangladesh. A total of 480 engorged mosquitoes were analyzed. The human blood index (HBI) of An. jeyporiensis varied from 4.17% in outdoor to 19.17% in indoor collections. Similarly, HBI of An. nivipes ranged between 0.83% and 22.50% from outdoor to indoor. For both species, cow blood indices were significantly higher than HBI in both indoor and outdoor collections. These data demonstrate the opportunistic and zoophilic nature of An. jeyporiensis and An. nivipes, which suggests that approaches such as zooprophylasis may prove beneficial as a control strategy.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Mohammad Shafiul Alam, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sarani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh. E-mail: shafiul@icddrb.org

Financial support: This research study was funded by the Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute (JHMRI) of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (Grant no. 00679).

Authors’ addresses: Hasan Mohammad Al-Amin, Mohammad Abdullah Heel Kafi, Wasif A. Khan, Rashidul Haque, and Mohammad Shafiul Alam, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh, E-mails: alamin@icddrb.org, kafi@icddrb.org, wakhan@icddrb.org, rhaque@icddrb.org, and shafiul@icddrb.org. Sumit Chakma, EngenderHealth Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh, E-mail: sumitchakma18@gmail.com. Abu Naser Mohon, Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, E-mail: manmohon@ucalgary.ca. David J. Sullivan Jr. and Douglas E. Norris, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Baltimore, MD, E-mails: dsulliv7@jhmi.edu and dnorris3@jhu.edu.

Ethical approval: This study was approved by the Research Review Committee and Ethical Review Committee of icddr,b, protocol number PR 09021. The purpose and objectives of the study were fully explained to the head of each household, and after obtaining informed written consent, the traps were installed for mosquito collection and host data were collected.

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