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Long-Term In vitro Cultivation of Plasmodium falciparum in a Novel Cell Culture Device

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  • 1 Centre François Baclesse, Normandie Université, UNICAEN, UR ABTE EA 4651, Caen, France;
  • | 2 Aix Marseille Univ, IRD, AP-HM, SSA, VITROME, Marseille, France;
  • | 3 Normandie Université, UNIROUEN, CETAPS EA 3832, Mont Saint Aignan Cedex, France;
  • | 4 Normandie Université, UNICAEN, INSERM U 1075 COMETE, Caen, France;
  • | 5 Normandie Université, UNICAEN, Plateau de Cytométrie en Flux, ICORE, Caen, France
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The standard in vitro cultivation procedure for Plasmodium falciparum requires gas exchange and a microaerophilic atmosphere. A novel system using a commercially available cell culture device (Petaka G3; Celartia Ltd., Powell, OH) was assessed for long-term cultivation of a P. falciparum reference laboratory clone in normal air. Parasite growth during 30 days was similar, or better, in Petaka G3 than that in the standard cultivation method with gas exchange in a CO2 incubator. The successful cultivation of P. falciparum in the Petaka G3 device suggests that low O2 content available in hemoglobin and dissolved gas in the blood is sufficient for long-term cultivation. This finding may open the way to novel methods to cultivate and adapt P. falciparum field isolates to in vitro conditions with more ease.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Philippe Eldin de Pécoulas, Centre François Baclesse, Normandie Université, UNICAEN, UR ABTE EA 4651, Caen 14000, France. E-mail: philippe.eldin-depecoulas@unicaen.fr

Financial support: This work was supported by a grant from the Royal Institute of Cambodian Traditional Medicine (IRMTC_ABTE-ToxEMAC_ValMyc-2015_Ext. 2017).

Authors’ addresses: Antoine Géry, Ho-Mai-Thy N’Guyen, David Garon, and Philippe Eldin de Pécoulas, Centre François Baclesse, Normandie Université, UNICAEN, UR ABTE EA 4651, Caen, France, E-mails: antoine.gery@gmail.com, maithy2511@gmail.com, estelle.richard@unicaen.fr, david.garon@unicaen.fr, philippe.eldin-depecoulas@unicaen.fr. Leonardo K. Basco, IRD, AP-HM, SSA, VITROME, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France, E-mail: lkbasco@yahoo.fr. Natacha Heutte, Normandie Université, UNIROUEN, CETAPS EA 3832, Mont Saint Aignan Cedex, France, E-mail: natacha.heutte@univ-rouen.fr. Marilyne Guillamin, Normandie Université, UNICAEN, INSERM U 1075 COMETE, Caen, France, and Normandie Université, UNICAEN, Plateau de Cytométrie en Flux, ICORE, Caen, France, E-mail: marilyne.duval@unicaen.fr.

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