1921
Volume 61, Issue 1_Supplement
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

A retrospective examination was made to determine parasitemia and episodes of fever in 97 patients, previously infected with , , and/or , who were reinfected with for treatment of neurosyphilis, the standard treatment at the time. Data were collected at the National Institutes of Health laboratories in Columbia, South Carolina and Milledgeville, Georgia during the period 1940 to 1963. Results were compared with observations recorded for patients following primary infection with . The mean daily percentage of patients with fever ≥ 101°F during the first 20 days of primary infection with was 42.4; the percentage with fever ≥ 104°F was 19.9%. Those previously infected with , , and had mean daily percentages of fever ≥ 101°F and ≥ 104°F of 39.1% and 14.8%, 39.1% and 19.4%, and 28.4%, and 11.3%, respectively. Previous infection with or had little, if any, effect on subsequent clinical malaria due to , whereas infection with resulted in reduced frequencies of fever. A similar comparison was made for parasite counts ≥ 1,000/μl and > 10,000/μl. The percentages for 268 patients during the first 20 days of primary infection with parasite counts ≥ 1,000/μl and ≥ 10,000/μl were 58.2% and 29.9%, respectively. Those previously infected with , , and had mean daily percentages of parasitemia ≥ 1,000/μl and ≥ 10,000/μl of 58.0% and 24.3%, 57.3% and 31.1% , and 45.9% and 19.0%, respectively. Previous infection with resulted in a reduction in the frequency of high-density parasitemia (≥ 10,000/μl) as well as an asexual parasite count ≥ 1,000/μl. These results suggest that and share common antigens that are able to induce parasitologic and clinical protection when infection with follows that with . The results did not suggest that protection to is provided by previous infection with or .

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1999-07-01
2017-11-22
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References

  1. Collins WE, Jeffery GM, , 1999. A retrospective examination of sporozoite- and trophozoite-induced infections with Plasmodium falciparum: development of parasitologic and clinical immunity during primary infection. Am J Trop Med Hyg 61 (suppl): 419. [Crossref]
  2. Collins WE, Jeffery GM, , 1999. A retrospective examination of sporozoite- and trophozoite-induced infections with Plasmodium falciparum: development of parasitologic and clinical immunity following secondary infection. Am J Trop Med Hyg 61 (suppl): 2035. [Crossref]
  3. Young MD, Hardman NF, Burgess RW, Frohne WC, Sabrosky CW, , 1948. The infectivity of native malarias in South Carolina to Anopheles quadrimaculatus . Am J Trop Med Hyg 28: 303311.
  4. Jeffery GM, Eyles DE, Young MD, , 1950. The comparative susceptibility of Anopheles quadrimaculatus and two strains of Anopheles albimanus to a Panama strain of Plasmodium falciparum . J Natl Malaria Soc 9: 349355.
  5. Eyles DE, Young MD, , 1950. The comparative susceptibility of Anopheles albimanus and Anopheles quadrimaculatus to a South Carolina strain of Plasmodium falciparum . J Infect Dis 87: 189193. [Crossref]
  6. Earle WC, Perez M, , 1932. Enumeration o f parasites in the blood of malarial patients. J Lab Clin Med 17: 11241130.
  7. Mayne B, Young MD, , 1941. The technique of induced malaria as used in the South Carolina State Hospital. Venereal Dis Information 22: 271276.
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