1921
Volume 86, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

is a superior horizontal and vertical vector of West Nile virus (WNV) compared with . transmitted WNV genotype NY99 (CT 2741-99 strain) horizontally to suckling mice at significantly lower rates than on Days 8, 9, 10, and 12 post-infection, and transmitted WNV genotype NY99 to offspring at a lower vertical transmission infection rate than transmitted WNV genotypes NY99 and WN02 (CT S0084-08 strain) with equal efficiency. Daily percent horizontal transmission of genotype NY99 by -infected and by intra-thoracic infection was not significantly different from daily transmission of genotype WN02 from Days 5–23 and Days 2–9 post-infection, respectively. Our findings do not support the previously published hypothesis that genotype NY99 was replaced in the New World by WN02 because of a shorter extrinsic incubation of WN02.

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  • Received : 21 Jul 2011
  • Accepted : 29 Sep 2011
  • Published online : 01 Jan 2012
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