1921
Volume 81, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Of 1,004 positive lots of mosquitoes fed on 229 humans infected with , 46.2% had 1–10 oocysts/(+)gut, 21.2% had 10–30 oocysts/(+)gut, 22.2% had 30–100 oocysts/(+)gut, and 10.4% had > 100 oocysts/(+) gut. The highest levels of infection occurred between 6 and 15 days after the peak in the asexual parasite count. Of 2,281 lots of mosquitoes fed on splenectomized monkeys infected with the Santa Lucia strain of 1,191 were infected (52.2%). The highest intensity infections ranged from 2.78 oocysts per positive gut in mosquitoes fed on to 6.08 oocysts per positive gut for those fed on to 10.4 oocysts per positive gut for those fed on . The pattern of infection for mosquitoes fed on splenectomized monkeys was similar to that obtained by feeding on humans, but the intensity, based on oocyst/(+)gut, was much lower.

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  • Received : 13 May 2009
  • Accepted : 08 Jun 2009

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