1921
Volume 72, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

A study was undertaken in villages endemic for Japanese encephalitis (JE) in Kerala in southern India during the period 1998–2001 to determine the host-feeding pattern of the major vector of JE in southeast Asia. A total of 3,067 blood-engorged were tested and 2,553 (82.2%) of the samples could be identified. had fed mainly (56.6%) on cattle. Pig feeding accounted 6.3% of the total samples. Some samples (n = 980, 38.3%) were of serologic mixed origin. Of 980 mixed blood-fed mosquitoes, 975 (99.5%) had imbibed blood from two distinct hosts and 5 (0.5%) imbibed blood from three distinct hosts. Mixed blood meals were mostly (96.7%) from cattle and goats. The epidemiologic implications of multiple feeding of on dampening (dead-end) hosts such as cattle and goats in the transmission of JE virus is discussed.

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2005-02-01
2017-11-21
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  • Received : 09 Jun 2004
  • Accepted : 13 Aug 2004

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