1921
Volume 103, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

The quality and type of specimen collection affect the sensitivity of real-time reverse transcriptase–PCR (rRT-PCR) for the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2. In this report, the course over time of rRT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 in 26 clinical specimens collected from the upper (nasopharyngeal and throat swabs) and lower (sputum) respiratory tracts of COVID-19 cases with pneumonia was investigated along with the clinical course. The preliminary results revealed that higher SARS-CoV-2 RNA concentration and longer time for detection make self-collected sputum a preferable specimen for the diagnosis and follow-up of COVID-19 pneumonia. Self-collection of sputum can minimize the risk of unnecessary exposure to healthcare workers, preserve the shortage of personal protective equipment, and limit viral transmission to the environment.

[open-access] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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  • Received : 28 May 2020
  • Accepted : 26 Jun 2020
  • Published online : 08 Jul 2020
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