1921
Volume 12, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
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Abstract

Summary

Studies were conducted with and to ascertain the behavior of Murray Valley encephalitis virus in these two species of mosquitoes and to determine if they could transmit this virus. Virus multiplication was demonstrated in both species of mosquitoes following ingestion of blood from viremic chicks. The multiplication of virus in mosquitoes followed an “eclipse” period during which it could not be detected. The rate of multiplication was similar in both species and the virus increased to approximately the same titer in each, although a higher percentage of became infected.

Specimens of both species of mosquito could transmit the virus after being held for extended periods of time which indicated the possibility that, once infected, they were capable of transmitting the virus for the duration of their lives. Serial transmission was obtained with after short periods of time and by both species after long periods of time.

Transmission experiments by individual feedings of the two species of mosquitoes were conducted. For more precise comparison of the two species they were infected simultaneously, whenever practical, by feeding them on viremic chicks. A total of 317 transmission attempts was made with of which 111 were positive. The mosquitoes were infected by feeding on donor chicks with viremia levels ranging from less than 1.0 log to more than 5.5 logs. The transmission attempts were made following extrinsic incubation periods ranging from 6 to 79 days.

A total of 351 transmission attempts was made with 56 were positive. The mosquitoes were infected by feeding on donor chicks with viremia levels ranging from less than 1.0 log to more than 5.5 logs. The transmission attempts were made following extrinsic incubation periods ranging from 6 to 62 days. was a much better laboratory vector especially when the combined effects of dosage of virus and various periods of extrinsic incubation are considered.

Two experiments were conducted to determine if Japanese B encephalitis virus could interfere with the transmission of Murray Valley encephalitis virus by infected sequentially. The results are interpreted as having yielded evidence of viral interference.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1963.12.425
1963-05-01
2017-09-22
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