1921
Volume 4, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
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Abstract

Summary

The relationship of some general environmental factors to the prevalence of infections and, more specifically, the effects of the availability of water for washing purposes on shigellosis rates were studied. The areas under observation were divided, either by city blocks, parts of blocks, or premises into groups with similar sanitational features. After each environmental grouping was completed, the infection rates for each of the groups was found.

Three conclusions which are applicable to diarrheal disease control were drawn from the results.

  • 1.  Areas could be defined by using common sanitational standards to indicate potentials for spread of organisms.
  • 2.  Infection rates of a neighborhood were found to vary with the proportion of poor housing in it.
  • 3.  Infection rates were highest where water was least available for personal hygiene. Consequently, availability of water for washing purposes must be considered along with purity of water in any diarrheal disease control program.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1955.4.718
1955-07-01
2017-11-20
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